News

EdNotes Express

Lincoln Public Schools Communication Services continues to look for the most effective way to provide you with information.  EdNotes is written and published specifically for the faculty and staff of Lincoln Public Schools.

If you have information you would like to include, please email Mary Kay Roth at mkroth@lps.org.

NARSP Offering Scholarship to Active Educators < New

The Nebraska Association of Retired School Personnel (NARSP) will be awarding two scholarships of $1000 each for the 2017-2018 academic year.  These scholarships will be awarded to active educators working toward an advanced degree/endorsement in a related field of education. 

This past year Matt Maw, Lincoln East High teachers, was a recipient of one of the scholarships awarded. 

The Lincoln Area Retired School Personnel (LARSP) organization will accept applications for the NARSP scholarships.   After applications are reviewed, the LARSP review committee will select two semi-finalists, and those applications will be sent to NARSP.  Those applications will be reviewed with the other semi-finalists from the fifteen local Units across Nebraska for the awarding of the two scholarships. 

Deadline for the receipt of completed applications is April 15, 2017

Applications and additional information may be requested by contacting: 

Robert or Billie Bussmann, LARSP Co-Presidents
3750 Normal Boulevard
Lincoln, NE 68506
402.488.3231

RBUSSMANN@neb.rr.com or bbuss@neb.rr.com

Posted on February 22, 2017


Eastridge Recycling Fundraiser < New

Posted on February 22, 2017


Nebraska Writing Project's Summer Institute < New

Please consider joining the Nebraska Writing Project's Summer Institute.  The dates are June 5 - 30 from 9 am - 3 pm.  It's an opportunity for anyone K-12 that teaches writing to improve their craft for students and themselves.  They'll spend time sharing teaching ideas, practicing writing, and working on an inquiry project on a writing/activist topic.  The course is worth 6 UNL graduate credits and there is a $750 stipend that may be applied for. 

Brochure

Posted on February 22, 2017


TCA networking students take home the gold, silver

Junior and senior networking students from The Career Academy competed in the Air Force Association’s CyberPatriot competition. The teams placed first and second in the gold and silver tier state round - awarded to the top three teams in each state within each division and tier.  Last year, TCA teams placed third in the gold division and first in the silver division.

During the competition, teams are put in the position of newly hired IT professionals tasked with managing the network of a small company. Competing from their classroom, teams are given a set of virtual images that represent an operating system. They then need to find cyber security vulnerabilities within the images and harden the system while maintaining critical services in a six hour period.

CyberPatriot is the National Youth Cyber Education Program.  There are three main programs within CyberPatriot: the National Youth Cyber Defense Competition, AFA CyberCamps and the Elementary School Cyber Education Initiative. CyberPatriot was conceived by the Air Force Association to inspire high school students toward careers in cybersecurity or other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines critical to our nation's future.

At the center of CyberPatriot is the National Youth Cyber Defense Competition. The competition puts teams of high school and middle school students in the position of newly hired IT professionals tasked with managing the network of a small company. In the rounds of competition, teams are given a set of virtual images that represent operating systems and are tasked with finding cybersecurity vulnerabilities within the images and hardening the system while maintaining critical services.  Teams compete for the top placement within their state and region, and the top teams in the nation earn all-expenses paid trips to Washington, DC for the National Finals Competition where they can earn national recognition and scholarship money.

Posted on February 20, 2017


Open Houses planned for Irving, Norwood Park

The public is invited to attend open house celebrations to mark the completion of renovations at Irving Middle School and Norwood Park Elementary School.

The Irving Middle School open house will be held Sunday, February 26, from 1 - 3 p.m. (2745 South 22nd Street). The public is invited to join staff and students for refreshments, guided tours, student art and music.

The Norwood Park Elementary School open house will be held Sunday, March 5, from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. (4710 North 72nd Street). There will be a brief ceremony with remarks and a reception starting at 2 p.m.

Improvements at Irving included: conversion to a more efficient geothermal heating and cooling system; overhaul of all classrooms; renovation of the library media area, music rooms, computer labs, office and other school spaces; addition of new windows; addition of new secure entrance; making the school technology-ready; adding new lighting and new roof.

At Norwood Park construction included: an upgrade to heating and cooling systems; creation of additional space to address deficiencies; a new kitchen and cafeteria; renovated main entrance; improving indoor air quality; and code updates.

Renovations at both schools were a result of the 2014 bond issue.

Posted on February 20, 2017


JROTC cadets share love of aviation with Mickle students

Over a ten week period, members of the Lincoln Northeast High School JROTC program will work with the Mickle Middle School Aviation and Space Community Learning Center.

Posted on February 20, 2017


Lincoln Public Schools: Highlights of 2/14 Lincoln Board of Education meeting


The Lincoln Board of Education held a regular meeting on Tuesday, February 14 at Lincoln Public Schools District Office, 5905 O St. The Board will hold its next meeting Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 6 p.m.

Early childhood grant approved

The Lincoln Board of Education Tuesday approved submission of an Early Childhood Expansion grant application that would expand early childhood offerings in the school district in LPS elementary school buildings.

The programs would ensure that each child enters a formal school setting with the same learning advantages as other children with early childhood staff and partners seeking opportunities to promote the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and language development of very young children and their families.  These programs would serve three- and four-year-olds who qualify for participation in an inclusive environment.

The $200,000 grant will be submitted to the Nebraska Department of Education, again offering funds to Early Childhood Programs in local communities. The Early Childhood Education Grant Program is intended to support the development of children in the birth to kindergarten age range through the provision of comprehensive center-based programs. Research demonstrates that the best approach to serve the families of these young children is through quality preschool services to assist with transitions to kindergarten. 

Board member Matt Schulte voted against submission, saying he was concerned about the possibility of this grant funding full-time early childhood programs – because they could not serve as many children as LPS does with a higher number of part-time programs.

Newly annexed property

The Board of Education assigns school attendance areas to property newly annexed to the city of Lincoln or newly platted. The Board heard a proposal that would assign a parcel of land – at South 66th Street and Pine Lake Road, Annexation Ordinance #20434, for 2016-17 school year – to Wysong Elementary School, Pound Middle School (Moore Middle School next school year) and Lincoln Southeast High School. Final approval will happen Feb. 28.  

Staff Celebration

The Board honored and recognized Cara Heminger, named World Language Outstanding Teacher of the Year by the Nebraska International Languages Association.

 

 

 

Posted on February 14, 2017


East High team qualifies for National Science Bowl

East High School had two teams participate in the Regional National Science Bowl Competition held at Wayne State College over the weekend. The red team came in third, and the blue team placed first - sending them to national competition in Washington, D.C.

"This is our first year as science bowl coaches and we are very excited that the students have this amazing opportunity to compete on a national level," commented Jennings. " All of the students on both teams competed their hardest and did very well."

The teams are coached by Jennings and Alicia Vossler. Both teams practiced against each other weekly to prepare for the event. 

"All of the students on both teams competed their hardest and did very well on Saturday. They had a great time on Saturday and were fueled with energy from each win."

Posted on February 14, 2017


Lux twins spell off in fierce finals of Spelling Bee

Twin brothers from Lux Middle School spelled off in the final rounds of fierce competition at the annual Lincoln Public Schools Spelling Bee – with Eswar Ramamurthy (who won last year) finally victorious over his brother, Sankar Ramamurthy with the spelling of the words “investiture” and “farfalle.”

“We studied a lot and we studied together,” Eswar said.  “And yep, I was rooting for my brother, but I was also rooting for myself.”

In the final and brutal rallies between just the two sixth grade brothers – which went on for almost one hour – the two boys went through words such as inoculate and champagne, maharaja and pomade, rubicon and exemplar, catalpa and serotonin, irascibility and bosque, amalgam and ineffable, dolorous and arabesque.

Zounds.

The 30th annual LPS Spelling Bee featured more than three hours of ferocious spelling competition between students from across the school district in fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades.  Early rounds started with perhaps gentler words such as performance and biology and bemused – but quickly progressed to the likes of vulpine and physicists and stilton.   

Round four, 13 spellers left: Then came resplendence and sudoku and jalapeno and geodesic.  Deep breathing, please. Round five: Dorsal and rabble-rouser and rotisserie.  Round six: Scoria and akimbo and gouge.  Round seven, four students remaining: Julienne and drollery.

Finally, two brothers left – almost an hour to the final victor.

Of course, as always, Spelling Bee competitors had plenty of family and friends in the audience to cheer them on – and a few encouraging words from grown-ups.

  • Don Mayhew, president of the Lincoln Board of Education: “You are part of a long and valuable tradition in our school district…I congratulate you all for having the courage to come here today and for having the work ethic to study and come here to compete.”
  • Michaela Hahn, principal of Culler Middle School, assured them that “spelling bees require talent and effort, and make you successful in life.”

The annual event is co-sponsored by LPS and the Lincoln Journal Star.

Posted on February 11, 2017


Teacher Stipend for ELL Graduate Classes

Stipends of $1,000 per class are available to LPS teachers in Title 1 schools who are taking college classes toward an ELL endorsement.  If you are interested in being considered, please complete the brief stipend application and return to Laura Salem, Box 58.  Please note timelines outlined on the application.  Many stipends are still available and we hope to honor a large number of requests.  You will be notified by email if you will be receiving the stipend.  If you have any questions about the stipend, please contact Laura Salem. 

 

Posted on February 09, 2017


Upcoming Financial Wellness Seminars for Employees

This is a reminder of upcoming Financial Wellness Seminars provided by Union Bank.  These sessions and free of charge for LPS employees and a guest.


Register by calling or emailing Kellee Krick  at 402-323-1467 or kellee.krick@ubt.com.

Saturday, February 11 -- “Fixing Your Scores and Using Credit"
Where/When:  Union Bank and Trust, 6801 S 27th - Lower Level; 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. 


Saturday, February 11 -- “Lincoln Public Schools Elective 403(b) Retirement Plan Informational Meeting”
Where/When:  Union Bank and Trust, 6801 S 27th - Lower Level; 10:00 - 11:00 p.m. 

Saturday, March 11 -- “15 Tips for Healthy and Wealthy Living"
Where/When:  Union Bank and Trust, 6801 S 27th - Lower Level; 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Wednesday, March 15 -- “Lincoln Public Schools Elective 403(b) Retirement Plan Informational Meeting”
Where/When:  Union Bank and Trust, 6801 S 27th - Lower Level; 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 1 -- “Retirement 101 Seminar"
Where/When:  Lincoln Public Schools Board Room, 5905 O Street, 9:00 - 11:00 a.m.

Thursday, April 6 -- “Lincoln Public Schools Elective 403(b) Retirement Plan Informational Meeting"
Where/When:  Union Bank and Trust, 6801 S 27th - Lower Level; 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 15 -- “Home Buying and Securing a Loan"
Where/When:  Union Bank and Trust, 6801 S 27th- Lower Level; 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

What is a 403(b)? It's a way to save for retirement!  The 403(b) plan lets you save a portion of each paycheck through payroll deduction, up to the maximum allowed by law.   You can save money pre or post tax.  

Financial Counseling - Continuum (EAP) offers financial assistance counseling including debt management, budgeting, taxes, retirement and college planning.  Continuum's services are free of charge to you and your immediate family members.  If you are referred for additional services, you will be responsible for the costs.  The phone number for Continuum is 402-476-0186 or 1-800-755-7636, or you can visit their website at www.4continuum.com.  

Posted on February 08, 2017


Lincoln Rotary Club Foundation Awards Grant to Support Everett Elementary School’s Fuel Up to Play 60 Program

Lincoln Rotary Club #14 Foundation awarded Everett Elementary School in the Lincoln Public School District $1,500 to support the school’s Fuel Up to Play 60 youth wellness program. With this grant, Everett Elementary will receive a Fuel Up to Play 60 Coach working with Midwest Dairy Council. The Fuel Up to Play 60 coach will assist the school in their efforts to create a healthy school environment for their more than 480 students. Implementing the Fuel Up to Play 60 program will allow for greater student participation in the program’s initiatives, focusing on both healthy eating and physical activity.
 
“Rotary 14 adopted Everett Elementary as one of our primary service efforts,” noted Mark Stephens, President of the club. “Our members have enthusiastically endorsed this effort and they’re looking forward to volunteering to help at the school.” Everett Elementary School is located just south of Downtown Lincoln. A high percentage of the students in the school come from families faced with financial challenges.
 
“One of the goals of the Fuel Up to Play 60 program is to not only encourage kids to live a healthy, active lifestyle, but to also build confidence and leadership skills among those who participate in the program,” says Susan Stibal, President of the Lincoln Rotary Foundation “That is why we are thrilled to see Everett Elementary receive these funds. This will allow the students to have the coaching and mentoring they need to succeed with the program.”
 
To learn more about Fuel Up to Play 60 or find out how schools, students or supporters can join the program, please visit FuelUpToPlay60.com.

Posted on February 08, 2017


96 LPS students honored at regional art competition

Out of 3,830 entries from across the state of Nebraska, 96 Lincoln Public School middle and high school students received recognition for their works in the Nebraska Regional Scholastic Art and Writing Awards.  

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards are the nation’s longest-running and most prestigious recognition program for creative teens in grades 7–12.    Those recieving Gold Key awards will have their work move on to the national stage with the possibility of being recognized as some of the most creative students in the nation.

Students who recieved recognition at the regional level are invited to a ceremony on February 25, from 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. in Omaha, and their artwork will be on display from February 23 - March 31 at Omaha Public Schools Teacher Administrative Center Auditorium (3215 Cuming Street).

 

 

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL:

School Student's Name Title Medium Award Teacher
Culler Mina Nguyen In An Alternative Universe... Comic HM Seacrest
Scott Sophia Heinrich Self Portrait Drawing & Illustration Silver Key Marx
Pound Caroline Miller Valor Drawing & Illustration Silver Key Rankin
Lefler Eric Chobanyan Flyburger Comic HM Sauer
HIGH SCHOOL: 

* moving on to national competition
 
School Student's Name Title Medium Award Teacher
East Griffin Schainost Duality Drawing & Illustration HM Hershey
Lincoln High Lexus Church Burning Orange on Green Photography Gold Key* Meyer
Lincoln High Jennah Duncan Harmony Digital Art HM Meyer
Lincoln High Yar Ei Old and Young Sculpture Gold Key* Stokes
Lincoln High Maria Guiza Beltran Unforgotten Drawing & Illustration Silver Key Stokes
Lincoln High Harry Miller The Hunter Drawing & Illustration Silver Key Clifford
Lincoln High Hel Moo Focus Drawing & Illustration Silver Key Clifford
Lincoln High Sam Peterson Through My Eyes Photography Gold Key* Meyer
Lincoln High Riana Lurice Prudente-Dazon Lumiere  Photography Silver Key Meyer
Lincoln High Maia Ramsay Outspoken Painting HM Stokes
Lincoln High Gabriella Soriente 'Speak Love' Printmaking Silver Key Deets
North Star  Deanna Allen Carmel Glazed Ceramics & Glass HM Leisinger
North Star  Deanna Allen  Raku Teapot Ceramics & Glass  Silver Key Leisinger
North Star  Sarah Cronin  Element with Voice Ceramics & Glass HM Leisinger
North Star  Sarah Cronin Metaphysical Volume Ceramics & Glass Silver Key Leisinger
North Star  Sarah Cronin Pure Fountain Ceramics & Glass Silver Key Leisinger
North Star Isabelle Engel Morning Light Photography Silver Key Reiss
North Star Emily Espinoza Gold's Photography HM Reiss
North Star Emily Espinoza Behind You Photography HM Reiss
North Star Emily Espinoza Quinceanera Photography Gold Key* Reiss
North Star Hannah Ferguson Urban Reflection Photography Gold Key* Reiss
North Star Davyd Kokhanets Ocean Painting HM Fast
North Star Davyd Kokhanets Colorado Painting Gold Key* Fast
North Star Davyd Kokhanets Travel Drawing & Illustration Gold Key* Fast
North Star Davyd Kokhanets Girl Painting HM Fast
North Star Davyd Kokhanets Faces 2 Printmaking Gold Key* Fast
North Star Davyd Kokhanets Herb Drawing & Illustration Silver Key Gillotti
North Star Davyd Kokhanets Student Drawing & Illustration Silvery Key Gillotti
North Star Leila Lynn Downtown Snow Drawing & Illustration Gold Key* Fast
North Star McKenna Miller The Forgotten Toys Sculpture Silver Key Leisinger
North Star Kristina Cassandra Nguyen Controlled Doodle Drawing & Illustration HM Gillotti
North Star John Nguyen The Effects of Stress
Upon a Teen
Photography HM Reiss
North Star Andres Novoa Book of Tyrants Mixed Media Silver Key Reiss
North Star Gretchen Payne Not Just A Number Mixed Media Silver Key Fast
North Star Gretchen Payne Societal Issues Art Portfolio HM Fast
North Star Gretchen Payne Beauty Jewelry Gold Key* Reiss
North Star Leynah Perez The Perez Family Painting HM Fast
North Star Milan Reeves Regret Digital Art HM Gillotti
North Star Dingkar Wuowrut Shades Photography Gold Key* Reiss
Northeast Shelby Bloom Wheel Thrown Delight Ceramics & Glass HM Rooney
Northeast Jazzmyne Bouwens Summer's Song Comic Art Silver Key Hrbek
Northeast Keara Castle Untitled Painting HM Perez
Northeast Trevor Fossler Self Portrait Digital Art Silver Key Elsener
Northeast Mohamed Komi Sunset Skies Photography Silver Key Elsener
Northeast Mohamed Komi Self Portrait Painting Silver Key Hrbek
Northeast  Brooklyn Medvin Self Portrait Drawing & Illustration HM Hrbek
Northeast Linneaa Nguyen Notes: My Life Comic Art Gold Key* Hrbek
Northeast Amy Perez Ballet Folklorico Photography Gold Key* Elsener
Northeast Juan Pol Saquic Slab Maze Ceramic & Glass HM Rooney
Northeast Emma Thomssen Untitled Painting Gold Key* Perez
Northeast Anh Tran Serene Photography Silver Key Elsener
Northeast Anh Tran My Kitchen Digital Art Gold Key* Elsener
Northeast Adriana Tyrrell Tea Party Levitation Digital Art Gold Key* Elsener
Northeast Adriana Tyrrell Murky Beauty Digital Art Silver Key Elsener
Northeast  Rachel Urso Blue Angel Comic Art Silver Key Hrbek
Northeast McKensi Webel Evolving Human or Automaton Mixed Media Gold Key* Hrbek
Northeast McKensi Webel  Follow the Red Road Ceramics & Glass HM Rooney
Northeast  Rebekah Wissink Darkness Art Portfolio Silver Key Elsener
Northeast  Rebekah Wissink  Reflection Digital Art HM Elsener
Northeast  Rebekah Wissink Shadows Photography Silver Key Elsener
Southeast  Sarah Al-Hilfy Leon Decisions Photography Gold Key* Buhrman
Southeast Miya Bryan Flowers Ceramics & Glass HM Jefferson
Southeast Dana Clements Evolution Painting Gold Key* Fast
Southeast Benjamin Friend Ceramic Study Ceramics & Glass Silver Key Jefferson
Southeast Benjamin Friend   Ceramic Study  Ceramics & Glass HM Jefferson
Southeast   Benjamin Friend  Ceramic Study  Art Portfolio Silver Key Ruth
Southeast  Chloe Kagan Snack Tray Ceramics & Glass HM Ruth
Southeast Ella Little Votive Candle Holder Ceramics & Glass Silver Key Ruth
Southeast Libby Siedell Sisters Drawing & Illustration Silver Key Jones
Southeast Libby Siedell Growth Art Portfolio Gold Key* Jones
Southwest  Hassan Al-Hamedi Eye Photography Gold Key* Petska
Southwest Brittany Athan Relax on my Own Photography Silver Key Petska
Southwest Olivia Badami Through the Trees Photography HM Petska
Southwest Rachel Beam White Rose Photography HM Petska
Southwest Zachary Bennetts How he loves Photography HM Petska
Southwest Hannah Dering Dandelion Dome Photography HM Leblanc
Southwest Hannah Dering Fire Eyes Photography Silver Key Leblanc
Southwest Hannah Dering Country Snow Photography Silver Key Leblanc
Southwest Jordan DeVoogd Eye Photography Gold Key* Petska
Southwest Jaden Ferguson The Weight on Her Shoulders Photography Silver Key Leblanc
Southwest Taylor Franzen Shadow People Photography Silver Key Leblanc
Southwest Karissa Goosic Cros Drawing & Illustration Gold Key* Walstrom
Southwest Karissa Goosic Hand painted reversible coat Fashion HM Walstrom
Southwest Grant Grosse Emotion's of an Alleyway Photography Silver Key Petska
Southwest Giselle Lizarraga Edgy Photography Silver Key Petska
Southwest Eryn McConnell Lonesome Lighthouse Photography Silver Key Leblanc
Southwest Thayden Pell Centre Stage  Photography HM Petska
Southwest Thayden Pell Manual Photography HM Petska
Southwest Ana Rodriguez Ciudad de Mexico Photography HM Petska
Southwest Sydney Schneider New York State of Mind Digital Art HM Petska
Southwest Sydney Schneider Business Man Photography HM Petska
Southwest Alexis Thomas Divided Photography HM Petska
Southwest Hanna Zimmerman Winter Wonder Photography Gold Key* Petska

Posted on February 07, 2017


Lux heads to National Science Bowl, other LPS schools place at regionals

Five middle school teams represented Lincoln Public Schools on Saturday in the regional U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl Competition at Wayne State College. Lux Middle School won the regional and will head to National Competition at the end of April.

“Our students learned about hard work, dedication and teamwork,” commented Luke Luxford, Lux science teacher. “Our students were dedicated to learning and reading as much science as they could since November in preparation for Saturday's event.”

The Lux Middle School team consists of five eighth grade students. Luxford credited their friendship for the win.

“This helps with teamwork and respect for the other members of the team. They have done such a great job of working together and helping each other grow in their science and math knowledge.  I am so proud of them all.”

Other LPS schools participating included two teams from Mickle Middle School, a team from Schoo Middle School, and a team from Goodrich Middle School. The Mickle Blue team placed third, and Schoo placed 4th.

Goodrich Middle School science teacher Craig Little said, “Science Bowl is a great experience for our students. It teaches them how to work together on a team to solve problems, which is a great skill to have for the workplace.”

Science teacher Katie Hammond at Mickle Middle School said her students could be heard saying it gave them a reason to be competitive without needing athletic ability.

She added, “Science Quiz Bowl gave our students the opportunity to educate themselves on content beyond the curriculum. This type of competition prepares students for high school by giving them more in depth knowledge about science topics.”

LPS science curriculum coordinator James Blake said, “The Science Curriculum Department is proud of all of the LPS schools who competed, because of all of the effort that went in for preparations and the competition on Saturday.  We wish Lux the best as they go on to represent Nebraska and Lincoln Public Schools at nationals!”

Posted on February 06, 2017


African-American Read-in February 10

The LPS Youth Development Team invites you to explore literature contributions of African-Americans at the annual African-American Read-In February 10, Noon to 1:00 p.m. This Read-In will be held in the Board Room of the Lincoln Public Schools District Office, 5905 “O” Street. The event is free and open to the public, and attendees are welcome to bring a lunch.

Music and reading by community stakeholders will explore African-American history and the rich history, role, and contributions of African-Americans in the world of literature and arts.

Readers and performers on February 10, include: Welcome provided by Mary Reiman, LPS Director of Media Services; Master of Ceremonies William Bryant, LPS Student Advocate for the African-American Community; playing of “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by Oriana Hawley, Lux Middle School scholar; Lameakia Collier, Executive Assistant Governmental Relations & Multicultural Office, Lincoln Public Schools; Dr. Jeannette Eileen Jones, Associate Professor of History and Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Yano Jones, Assistant Principal, Schoo Middle School – Lincoln Public Schools; Brandon Bradley, Head Wrestling Coach & Assistant to the Athletic Director, Nebraska Wesleyan University; Jasmine Cincore, Scholar-Athlete (basketball) University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Taylor Bishop, Reporter, 10/11 KOLN/KGIN; Shanna Letcher, LPS Student Advocate for the African-American Community and a performance of “Let Your Light Shine” by the Belmont TRACKS Empowerment scholars of Belmont Elementary School. The Read-In represents ongoing collaborations between LPS and LCL. The National Council for the Teachers of English hosts the National African American Read-In. This national literacy initiative kicks off during Black History Month. The purpose of the read-in is to share the unique experiences found in African-American literature with students from pre-K to adult.

An additional African-American Read-In will be held on February 21, 2016, Noon-1:00 p.m., at the Loren Eiseley Branch Library, 1530 Superior St., Lincoln, NE 68521. Readers and performers will include community stakeholders from business, city/state, athletics, scholars, and more. No reservations are required. More information is available by calling 402.436.1974, email at pfergus@lps.org, or at lincolnlibraries.org.

Posted on February 06, 2017


Retirements announced for principals, administrators

In the past week, several top administrators from Lincoln Public Schools have announced their retirement at the close of the 2016-17 school year. 

Jane Stavem, associate superintendent for Instruction at LPS, noted: “We are so grateful for the legacy of excellence these leaders will leave with Lincoln Public Schools.  They have demonstrated their commitment to our students and families through their dedicated service and the many ways they have made our school district a great place to learn and grow.”  

Retiring at the close of the school year are:

Paula Baker, principal at Pyrtle Elementary School since 2012, was previously principal at Pershing Elementary School and coordinator at Maxey Elementary School.  She also taught at Zeman, Beattie, Belmont and Maxey elementary schools, as well as for Westside Community Schools and Millard Public Schools.

She earned her Bachelor’s Degree from Kearney State College and her Master’s Degree from Doane University,  

Deb Dabbert, principal at Eastridge Elementary School since 2009, was previously principal at Belmont and Hawthorne elementary schools, coordinator at Brownell Elementary School, and special education coordinator at Meadow Lane Elementary School.  Before that she taught at Huntington Elementary School, Omaha Public Schools and Palmyra/Bennet Schools.

She earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Kathy Fleming has been principal at Saratoga Elementary School since 2005, and previously was assistant principal at Saratoga and coordinator at Campbell Elementary School.  She taught at McPhee Elementary School.  She earned her Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Northern Iowa, and her Master’s Degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Rhonda True, principal of Pershing Elementary School since 2012, was also assistant principal at Prescott Elementary School and instructional coordinator at Elliott Elementary School. She taught at Lux Middle School, and Rousseau and Sheridan elementary schools, and Grand Island Public Schools.  She earned her Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Nebraska at Kearney and her Master’s Degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Ruth Ann Wylie, principal at Prescott Elementary School since 2009, was also principal at Riley Elementary, and coordinator and teacher/team leader at Riley.  Wylie served as president of the Lincoln Education Association from 1991-1997.  She taught at Rousseau Elementary School and what used to be Park Elementary School.  She earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Mary Reiman has served as the director of Library Media Services since 2005.  She began her career as a school librarian in Wakefield, Nebraska before moving to Lincoln Southeast High School as media specialist there. She earned her Bachelor’s Degree from the University of South Dakota, her Master of Library Science Degree from Emporia State University and her Master of Adult Education and Educational Administration from the University of Nebraska.

Cindy Brunken, Special Education supervisor since 2008, was previously the Special Education Coordinator at Lux Middle School and Team Leader for Speech-Language Pathology for LPS.  Brunken also was the speech-language pathologist and reading teacher at Lux, and served as speech-language pathologist at Rousseau Elementary School, Lincoln Southeast High School, and the previous Park Elementary School. She earned her Bachelor’s Degree at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, her Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership at Doane University, and her Master’s Degree in Speech-Language Pathology from UNL.

Wendy Henrichs has served as athletic director for Lincoln East High School since 2005. Prior to her current position, she was assistant athletic director at East High and an English teacher. She also taught and coached at Grand Island Senior High School  She earned her Bachelor’s Degree at Central College, and her Master’s Degree at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Marge Theel has worked at LPS since 1991 and is currently supervisor of Health Services.  At LPS she has also been a First Aid instructor, Team Leader and Medication Administration Certification Instructor. Prior to LPS, Theel worked for the Lincoln Lancaster County Health Department as a Public Health Nurse, and at Bryan Memorial Hospital as a staff nurse. She earned her Bachelor’s Degree at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and her Master’s Degree at Cambridge College.

Posted on January 27, 2017


2017 MLK Youth Rally and March

Students and community members gathered on Saturday, January 21, to honor the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for the annual Youth Rally and March. The event originally scheduled for Monday, had to be moved due to winter weather.

Below are video highlights from the event:

Posted on January 27, 2017


Lincoln Public Schools: Highlights of 1/24 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

The Lincoln Board of Education held a regular meeting on Tuesday, January 24, at Lincoln Public Schools District Office, 5905 O St. The Board will hold its next meeting Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 6 p.m.

Chromebooks: Heading into third year of Instructional Technology Plan

The Lincoln Board of Education approved the purchase of individual Chromebooks for all LPS students grades 2-12.

The purchase covers Chromebooks for more than 3,000 sixth graders as well as for more than 8,300 students at the four remaining high schools where students do not currently have Chromebooks (Lincoln High, Lincoln East, Lincoln North Star and Lincoln Southwest), and expands on the original plan to add approximately 3,250 second grade students across the district.

Newly annexed property

The Board of Education assigns school attendance areas to newly annexed or platted city property.  The Board approved newly annexed property called Grandview Estates 1st Addition and proposed these attendance areas: Wysong Elementary School, Pound Middle School (Moore Middle School next school year) and Lincoln Southeast High School.

Grants

The Board held a first reading and will vote at the Feb. 14 meeting on an Early Childhood Expansion grant application in the amount of $200,000 for LPS to expand early childhood education offerings, with a required 100% match which will be provided through space and equipment that are already in place.  An additional amount $25,000 of grant funds will be requested and used for start-up costs.

After a second reading, the Board approved a five-year, $687,300 State 21st Century Community Learning Center Continuation Grant for the Belmont Elementary, Brownell Elementary, Prescott Elementary and Culler Middle CLC schools. The continuation grant will build on the success these sites have experienced over the past five years.  

Policy changes approved

The Board approved changes in policies related to Community Relations including distribution of community service materials, and use of students for non-school projects.

Strategic Plan Update

The committee is ready to begin the next phase with the community study group and will hold their first meeting Wednesday, Jan. 25. The survey answers and community focus group comments have been recorded, organized by LPS staff and cataloged so it may be accessed by the study group to use in writing the strategic plan.

Student Presentation

Throughout second semester, third grade classrooms across Lincoln Public Schools start “hatching” the popular embryology unit, with “expectant” third graders watching, studying and awaiting the hatching and arrival of baby chicks.  The activity represents a great partnership with the University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension in Lancaster Office, as well as a wonderful learning opportunity in the study of a developing embryo.

Presenting about the embryology project was:

  • James Blake, K-12 Science Curriculum Specialist for Lincoln Public Schools
  • Cole Meador, Extension Associate, 4-H (Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County)
  • Bryce Cudaback, Kloefkorn Elementary School third grade science teacher
  • Kloefkorn third graders:  Owen Blake and Ayush Mishra

LPS Combined Community Campaign

John Neal reported that in October Lincoln Public Schools 2016 Combined Community Campaign raised over $156,000.  The Combined Community Campaign raises funds for agencies represented by the United Way, Community Health Charities of Nebraska, and the Community Services Fund.

This year we set a record of overall number of donors with 3,025 LPS staff members contributing to the campaign - setting a three-year high in percentage participation at 48 percent. A record 47 buildings and departments met the 50 percent participation goal.

Top percentage of staff participation at each level included:

  • Southeast High School - 55.95%
  • Schoo Middle School - 100%
  • Fredstrom Elementary School and Beattie Elementary School - 100%

Lincoln Public Schools is proud of its employees and would like to thank them for the contributions.

Posted on January 24, 2017


200 volunteers needed for science fair

We are pleased to announce the 22nd Annual Zoetis-LPS-GSK Science Fair on Thursday, March 2, 2017.  The fair will be held at the Lancaster Event Center-Pavilion 1, located at 4100 N 84th Street in Lincoln. 

Once again, we expect nearly 600 fifth through eighth grade students to descend upon the Event Center eager to share their discoveries with the Lincoln community.  There will be mazes, chemical reactions, paper airplanes, and of course, no science fair would be complete without an erupting volcano or two.  In addition, we have invited over 60 special presenters from the greater Nebraska area who will entertain and educate all who attend through many hands-on activities. 

All that is missing is YOU!  We need your help to make this science fair happen.  We need community members to serve as project judges, student assistants, and registration staff.  A description of the various volunteer positions is included with this mailing. 

How can you register to help?  Just follow the steps listed below.  Please note… all registrations must be completed on-line by the volunteer. 

If you would like to volunteer for the science fair, please follow these steps… 

a) Review the job descriptions for the various volunteer positions.  Descriptions are included below.

b) Access the volunteer registration form directly HERE or go to www.lps.org  (type in keyword Science) which will bring up the LPS Science homepage.  Scroll down to the bottom where you’ll see Click here to be a volunteer listed under 2017 Zoetis-LPS-GSK Science Fair.  

c) Complete the registration form and submit it.  Periodically, we will be sending out an email to all registrants indicating that we’ve received your registration. 

Please respond by February 17th.   If you have any questions, please contact me at 402-436-1140 or rsettles@lps.org.  Or you may contact Becky Rock  (brock@lps.org) . 

Science Fair Volunteer Positions

Project Judge Our greatest need!  (5:00pm-until completion)
You would review six to eight student projects.  Utilizing a uniform judging form, you will discuss the project with the students to see what they have learned.  (A refresher training session for judges will be held the night of the fair beginning at 4:30 pm at the Lancaster Event Center.

Judge Registration (4:00-6:00 pm)
You would greet judges as they arrive at the fair site.  You will also distribute judging forms, clipboards, and supplies to judges.

Information Table & Volunteer Registration (3:45-6:00 pm or 6:00-8:15 pm)
You would greet all ‘non-judging’ volunteers.  You would also register all students who did not complete their registration through their school.  You will also help answer questions for our participants and visitors.

Student Registration (3:45-6:00 pm)
You would distribute nametags, project numbers, and table assignments to all student participants.

T-Shirt Distribution (3:45- 6:00 pm)
You would distribute t-shirts to our student participants.

Table Guide  A High Need for volunteers! (3:45-6:00 pm)
You would assist students in finding their assigned table location on the floor.

Judging Form Review  (6:30-9:00 pm)
You would review each judging form for mathematical accuracy, organize forms and possible data entry.    

Posted on January 18, 2017


Dinosaurs & Disasters at Morrill Hall

The University of Nebraska State Museum and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences will host "Dinosaurs and Disasters" family fun day with scientists from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Feb. 4, at Morrill Hall, (south of 14th and Vine streets, UNL City Campus). 

“Dinosaurs and Disasters” is one of Lincoln's most exciting science learning events for children and their families. 

UNL scientists, graduate and undergraduate students will provide hands-on activities and demonstrations to help visitors better understand change over time.  Visitors can test their knowledge of the Earth’s history, learn about animals and their environments past and present, even go back in time in the ‘Antarctic Time Machine’.  Guests are encouraged to bring a rock or fossil for a scientist to identify. 

Mueller Planetarium will present the fulldome show “Firefall” (show length 35 minutes). Throughout Earth's violent history, impacts from comets and asteroids have mercilessly shaped its surface. Terrifying and majestic, these invaders from space are capable of utter destruction, yet they have delivered life-giving water and most of the organic materials necessary for life.  Show times are 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon, and 1, 2 and 3 p.m. Due to overhead motion and occasional loud sounds that can be overwhelming children must be at least four years of age to be admitted. 

Regular museum and planetarium admission charged. Parking is free in front of the museum.

For more information go to http://www.museum.unl.edu.

Presented by the UNL Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the University of Nebraska State Museum.

Posted on January 18, 2017


Lincoln Public Schools: Highlights of 1/10 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

Highlights of 1/10 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

The Lincoln Board of Education held a regular meeting on Tuesday, January 10 at Lincoln Public Schools District Office, 5905 O St. The Board will hold its next meeting Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 6 p.m.

Chromebooks: Heading into third year of Instructional Technology Plan

The Lincoln Board of Education will pave the way for Lincoln Public Schools to move into the third phase of the Instructional Technology Plan with the Tuesday consideration of a purchase that will mean all LPS students grades 3-12 will have access to individual Chromebooks – and in the future, potentially the addition of second graders. 

The purchase discussed Tuesday – with final approval set for Jan. 24 – would cover Chromebooks for more than 3,000 sixth graders as well as for more than 8,300 students at the four remaining high schools where students do not have Chromebooks (Lincoln High, Lincoln East, Lincoln North Star and Lincoln Southwest).

The original Instructional Technology Plan called for providing Chromebooks to students grades 3-12, but Board members discussed the possibility of providing the gadgets to second graders as well. Funding for addition of one more grade could be provided by extending the original three-year plan into a four-year plan.

January 2017 purchase of Chromebooks for distribution to secondary students in fall of 2017 would allow the school district to save $8 per device (a total of $66,904) and ensure all students are using the same device model.  An advantage of all students using the same model Chromebook is that as devices are retired from service, their parts can be used for repairs on those devices remaining in service.

These purchases were recommended: a total of $2.1 million to Sterling Computers (Dakota Dunes, South Dakota) to purchase 11,421 Dell 11-inch Chromebooks; $313,000 to Dell EMC, Inc. (Round Rock, Texas) for device management licensing (Chrome Management); and KACE asset management licenses including three-year maintenance. 

Newly annexed property

The Board of Education assigns school attendance areas to newly annexed or platted city property.  The Board considered newly annexed property called Grandview Estates 1st Addition and proposed these attendance areas: Wysong Elementary School, Pound Middle School (Moore Middle School next school year) and Lincoln Southeast High School.  The Board votes final approval Jan. 24. 

Grants

The Board of Education Tuesday approved submission of two grants and considered submission of a third.

The Board voted submission of:

  •  A proposal to United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County to support the Two Generation Family Literacy Program in the amount of approximately $30,000 for a one-year funding cycle. The evidence-based Family Literacy model followed by LPS includes the following four components: Adult Education Instruction—provided through high quality ESL classes; Children's Education—teaching literacy through a viable district curriculum; Parent and Child Together Time; and Parenting Classes.
  •  A five-year, $352,000 State 21st Century Community Learning Center grant that will bring necessary resources and support to establish Campbell Elementary School as a CLC school.  The federally-funded grant application is submitted to the Nebraska Department of Education.  The vote on submission of this grant was 5-1, with Board member Matt Schulte opposed until further review and guidelines for CLCs are completed.

The Board considered submission of:

  •  A five-year, $687,300 State 21st Century Community Learning Center Continuation Grant for the Belmont Elementary, Brownell Elementary, Prescott Elementary and Culler Middle CLC schools. The continuation grant will build on the success these sites have experienced over the past five years.  Final approval happens Jan. 24.

Policy changes proposed 
The Board approved changes in policies related to Community Relations including distribution of community service materials, and use of students for non-school projects.  

Strategic Plan update

The Board of Education Tuesday received an update about the progress and next steps involved with “Voices for the Future,” the school district’s strategic planning process.  

Over the last few months, LPS has reached out to more than 37,500 people – and collected responses from more than 3,800 citizens. The collected data is now being reviewed and analyzed: categorizing responses, recognizing key themes and identifying representative quotations. Then that data will go to a Community Study Team later this month, a team that will develop and create proposed action steps.

Sarah Salem, director of Continuous Improvement and Professional Learning, thanked the Board of Education for approaching this endeavor in a meaningful way that required time and work: “You did not take the easy path and say, ‘There’s the survey, go fill it out.’  You chose going out into the community, speaking to more than 50 different community groups: non-profits, cultural centers, businesses and more…We had so many voices engaged…and it’s so important for our stakeholders to know we value their opinion.”

Oscar Pohirieth, cultural specialist and coordinator for the Bilingual Liaison Program, also thanked the Board “for believing we needed to communicate with every family…As they arrived at our strategic planning sessions, some of our families were surprised, some were impressed, some were afraid…and at the end of the sessions, all the families felt comfortable because we made them feel comfortable.  I thank you all…for this collaborative effort.” 

A reminder: Lincoln Public Schools is seeking to engage citizens throughout the community to help refresh and develop a strategic plan to chart the course for the school district over the next five years. The strategic planning process involves gathering community voices through civic, school and community meetings, as well as through social media and online surveys – encouraging our citizens to dream big, imagine new ideas, help identify creative, innovative goals – necessary to write the story of our future. Our mission is to ensure LPS students experience a world-class education in preparation for college, career and life. 

Staff Celebrations

The Board honored and recognized key Lincoln Public Schools employees who have made valuable contributions to the initial phase of Voices for the Future, the first step in the school district’s strategic planning initiative. Those honored included the facilitators, translators, bilingual liaisons and LPS Education Service Unit research team who were essential in the first phase of presenting to community groups and collecting data.

Facilitators

Amy Carnie

Amy Clark

Rik Devny

Carrie Foster

Jodi Frager

John Gloe

Brittany Hying

Brandi Jantzen

Monica Jochum

Amanda Krivda

Jamie Mapp

Megan McElfresh

Jennie Murphy

Robert Rickert

Sherri Robinson

Sarah Salem

Sue Showers

Erik Witt

Bilingual Liaisons

Khudhur Ali (Kurdish Bilingual Liaison)

Mohammed Alnajem (Arabic Bilingual Liaison)

Antonio Cubas ((Latino Bilingual Liaison)

Erick Ernesto Saavedra Avila (Latino Bilingual Liaison)

Khalaf Hesso (Kurdish Bilingual Liaison)

Tosh Jock (Nuer - Sudanese Bilingual Liaison)

Ellie Kasab (Russian Bilingual Liaison)

Monica Lieske (Latino Bilingual Liaison)

Nhung Nguyen (Vietnamese Bilingual Liaison)

Hugo Orellana (Latino Bilingual Liaison)

Toan Tran (Vietnamese Bilingual Liaison)

Peh Wah Moo (Karen Bilingual Liaison)

Wah Wah Moo (Karen - Burmese Bilingual Liaison)

Daniel Wal (Nuer - Sudanese Bilingual Liaison)

Education Service Unit research team

Bethany Brunsman

Leslie Eastman

Dawn Mazzie

Rob McEntarffer

Teresa Wanser Ernst

Posted on January 17, 2017


High School Information Night for Eighth Grade Families

At Lincoln Public Schools, students have an option to choose which high school they would like to attend. All the high schools provide a high-quality educational experience for all their students, but each school also offers different opportunities and programs.

Each high school will still be offering open houses for eighth-grade families to tour and ask questions before the enrollment deadline. 

High School Open Houses:

Tuesday, January 10, 2017 North Star High School 6:30 p.m
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 East High School 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, January 12, 2017 Southwest High School 6:30 p.m.
***Date changed due to weather***
Monday, January, 23, 2017
Southeast High School 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday, January 18, 2017 Northeast High School 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, January 24, 2017 Lincoln High School 6:30 p.m.

4 ways 8th-grade students and families can make the most of high school information nights

#1 - Attend as many high school information nights as you wish. They are scheduled on different nights for this reason. Start discussions early with all involved (see #2).

#2 - Consider the student’s current and future interests and talents prior to the event. Then ask questions about those topics to teachers and current students at the information event at each school.

#3 - Any student can be successful academically at any school. Look for ways the student can get involved and participate, while staying on top of their studies.

#4 - Consider the student’s current friends, but also consider the opportunity to make new friends. Making new friends exposes students to new activities and common interests.

Posted on January 17, 2017


At Goodrich, students united by community

Sarah Davis, eighth grade English teacher at Goodrich Middle School, describes a class project that brought many students from different cultures and languages together based on something they all had in common — living in Lincoln.

 

Through the rumble of steps and lockers that echo through the hallways at Goodrich Middle School, the sound of multiple languages and voices trickle through the crowd. With students speaking 16 languages, the words flow from person to person in a dialogue that is sometimes difficult to interpret literally. However, the expressions of students laughing and greeting one another on their way to class need no interpretation. 

Despite their differences in background or language, the students at Goodrich are all united by sharing a common community and home. In the eighth grade English classrooms, teachers asked students to volunteer their linguistic skills in an activity that not only challenged them academically but also allowed them to find common ground in their shared experiences living in Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Mirroring a writing style that will follow them into high school, students rallied behind a common theme to support the claim that Lincoln is a good place to live, that our community is one that offers a good education, a safe environment, and an atmosphere that is beautiful and relaxing (among others). Students then worked together to research facts and statistics that would support their reasoning. Finally, students explained how their research supported their reasons. 

One excerpt goes as follows, “This is a city full of diverse cultures. The Lincoln Journal Star quoted Mayor Beutler as saying ‘Our city can take great pride in its longtime reputation as a place where everyone can feel welcome and enjoy a high quality of life.’  Welcoming other culture keeps Lincoln diverse. Diversity is important because it gives people a chance to experience different cultures and lifestyles.” 

With their combined efforts, students created books and projects to showcase their claims and all of the work they put into supporting their arguments. Using resources generously donated by the Nebraska Alumni Association, the Lincoln Convention & Visitors Bureau, and the Nebraska Tourism Commission, students found photos and maps to add more life to their projects. 

In a final step, some students volunteered to transform these projects into something that really brings to light the amazing complexity and depth that the Lincoln community has to offer. Working together, multilingual students translated the messages of this project into Arabic, Farsi, Kurdish, Pashto, Spanish, and Vietnamese. 

Posted on January 12, 2017


Randolph students hear direct from NASA

On December 20th, third, fourth and fifth graders at Randolph Elementary gathered in the gymnasium to connect to a virtual field trip with NASA for the program "Our Solar Neighborhood" presented by Lisa Illowsky from NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California.  
 
The two-way interactive program from NASA was arranged by Bryan Ebeler, the computer teacher at Randolph, engaged students in learning how NASA uses the information gathered by spacecraft to piece together our understanding of our solar system and beyond.
 
Students were asked to distinguish the difference between planets and stars, categorize the planets as major and dwarf planets, and examine the reasons why planets are different sizes by applying their knowledge of the states of matter.
 
Demonstrations showed students differences between planets in relation to their distances from the Sun, and allowed plenty of Q & A time.
 
"It was really fun to see students at Randolph engage fully with a NASA scientist without having to leave their school through a virtual field trip," said James Blake, K-12 science curriculum specialist.  "I will be exploring ways to continue to expand these free digital offerings to classrooms as they greatly enhance the science curriculum using tools that all teachers have access to."
 
An impressive question from one student was, "What college degree do I need to have to get a job at NASA?" The NASA educator assured students they could get a degree in almost any field and find a place at NASA.
 
"It was wonderful to hear that these young students were thinking about a future career supporting NASA research and missions," commented LPS distance learning manager Linda Dickeson. 

Posted on December 21, 2016


Empower yourself to give your students more

Research shows you can improve students’ achievement by fostering their well-being. Learn how from a Nebraska expert in positive education. Prof. Randy Ernst will speak  on “The Positive Classroom: Interventions Promoting Well-being.”  

Join us and check out NWU’s Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction, connect with peers and enjoy refreshments.

January 24, 5-6:30 p.m.
Nebraska Wesleyan University
Great Hall, Smith Curtis Classroom-Administration Building
RSVP to Angela today:  apearson@nebrwesleyan.edu or 402.465.2329

Posted on December 21, 2016


Nutrition Services announces launch of NutriSlice

The Nutrition Services Department has implemented NutriSlice – a new interactive web-based program that you can access on the LPS website and view on your desktop and/or download as an app to your smartphone.  

From the NutriSlice front page, simply click on the down arrow and select the appropriate school level or program, then choose what type of menu you would like to see – breakfast, lunch, or snack.  

By hovering over the menu option you can view a picture of the food item with a brief description along with nutrition facts and common allergens.  Menus may be printed by selecting the print menu icon at the top of the menu screen.  

The program also allows those with special diets to filter the menu items by clicking on the special diet button to show those foods that meet their specific dietary needs while crossing out the items that could potentially cause a problem.  

Additionally, for those students who need to track carbohydrate counts, a button is available that when clicked on will add the carb count to each item on the menu.  

Menu Items can also be translated into Spanish by clicking on the select language icon.

Posted on December 21, 2016


Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast

The 24 MLK “Freedom Breakfast” will be held Friday, Jan. 13, 2017, at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Lincoln. The breakfast is from 7:30-8:30 a.m., and doors open at 7 a.m. Tickets are $20, and there’s also an option to sponsor an individual or group.
 
Dr. Hank Bounds, president of the University of Nebraska, will be the keynote speaker. Additional comments will be made by Southeast Community College President Dr. Paul Illich, Lincoln Mayor Chris Beutler, Lincoln Public Schools Supt. Dr. Steve Joel, and University of
Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor, Dr. Ronnie Green.
 
The event is sponsored by Lincoln Public Schools, Southeast Community College, and University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Proceeds from the breakfast will go toward scholarships for students in Lincoln. Last year, six $1,000 scholarships were awarded.
 
“The MLK breakfast typically draws hundreds of participants who represent the rich cultural, ethnic and generational diversity in our community,” said Jose Soto, vice president for Access/Equity/Diversity at SCC and one of the event’s organizers. “It’s a time of reflection and unity in recognition of Dr. King’s contributions to our nation and community.”
 
For more information on this event or to purchase tickets, contact Ed Wimes at ewimes@nebraska.edu.

Posted on December 21, 2016


Students invited to enter Inaugural Civics Essay Contest, Nominate Teachers for Excellence in Civics Education

The Federal Bar Association is holding its inaugural civics essay contest posing the question: “What Does an Impartial Judicial System Mean to Me?”

This year’s essay contest holds a 500-word limit for submissions from middle school students and a 1,000-word limit for high school students. Oral submissions are also accepted through the StoryCorps App and are limited to three minutes in length. The middle school category is awarding $1,000, $500, and $250 for first, second, and third place respectively. The prizes are doubled for high school winners, with first place receiving $2,000, second place receiving $1,000, and third place receiving $500.

Writers of the first place submissions in each category are rewarded with a trip to Washington, D.C and may be accompanied by one parent/guardian, with the organization providing funds for travel. This trip coincides with the Federal Bar Association’s Mid-Year Meeting on Saturday, March 18, 2017.

This essay is an opportunity for the young people of this nation to voice their opinions on the judicial system in a constructive and rewarding way.

All essays and recordings should be submitted to jalbertson@fedbar.org by Monday, January 23, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST. Recordings may also be submitted via the StoryCorps App.

The nomination form for Nomination of Teachers for Excellence in Civics Education is located at: www.fedbar.org/civicsessay.aspx. Nomination forms should be submitted to jalbertson@fedbar.org by Monday, January 23, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST. The selected teachers will be honored with a plaque.

Questions may be directed to Josh Albertson by email: jalbertson@fedbar.org or phone at 571-481-9118 or Contest Chair: Maria Vathis: maria.vathis@bryancave.com or phone at 312-602-5127. For more information visit: www.fedbar.org/civicsessay.aspx.

Posted on December 21, 2016


Every Knight Needs a Castle

Hoping to inspire current and future students in the spirit of service, Lincoln Southeast Principal Brent Toalson created the Service Wall of Fame to honor those students and staff - past and present- who contribute to the community.

The first project honored last year was the playground at Antelope Park. This year, Toalson honored the Every Knight Needs a Castle project from the 1998-99 school year at the winter pep rally.

During the project, then LSE principal Nancy Becker was looking for something the whole school could get behind.

“We were starting to get really big and I could see that there was all these different groups and they weren’t connecting,” Becker said. “They just needed to be presented with a challenge and then they took it from there.”

Becker met with the leadership from student organizations and presented the idea of participating in Habitat for Humanity, but with a twist. This home would benefit one of their fellow classmates and his family.

“Because of Darnell’s situation we had to change the whole layout of the floor plan because we needed to have everything accessible. That’s where our industrial arts kids got involved with design and it was great,” Becker added.

The rest of the student body got involved by volunteering hours to work on the house, or by raising funds. In all, over $30,000 were raised by the Knights for the project.

Dianna Utley and Darnell, her son and Southeast student at the time, worked alongside the students to complete the house that they would eventually move into.

“I just want to thank everybody. We wouldn’t have what we have if it wasn’t for you,” Utley said.

Toalson used the event to announce a new initiative at Southeast High School.

“I’m excited to announce a new service opportunity for next year’s seniors. Juniors, if you are interested, we encourage you to submit a proposal or business plan that would partner with local businesses or non-profits to complete a service project. The winning project will receive a cash reward to complete the project during their senior year.”

The Pay It Forward Service Project will begin in the 2017-18 school year. Lincoln Southeast High School will be working with the Foundation for Lincoln Public Schools on funding for the project. More information on the Pay It Forward Service Project can be found here: https://foundationforlpsorg.presencehost.net/lse-pay-it-forward

Posted on December 14, 2016


Lincoln Public Schools: Highlights of 12/13 Lincoln Board of Education work session, meeting

The Lincoln Board of Education held a work session and a regular meeting on Tuesday, December 13 at Lincoln Public Schools District Office, 5905 O St.  The Board will hold its next meeting Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017 at 6 p.m.

BOARD WORK SESSSION Highlights

LPS 10-year Facilities and Infrastructure Plan

Imagine four new elementary schools, two new middle schools and new high school space in some form – as part of the next decade at Lincoln Public Schools. 

Those possibilities, and much more, were introduced at a Lincoln Board of Education work session Tuesday as the beginning of a conversation about what should be identified as priorities for facilities and infrastructure in the next 10 years for our school district.

Lanny Boswell, chair of the Board of Education Planning Committee, said the Planning Committee has spent the last several months reviewing enrollment trends, student demographics, the city’s comprehensive plan – has taken city growth tours to study the hot spot development areas of Lincoln.  “This work session is the beginning of a lengthy conversation, an introduction of the needs in our school district.”

In fact, the work session was only the first of what will be a Board and community discussion in updating what is known as the “LPS 10-Year Facilities and Infrastructure Plan” – a document that guides the development of schools, additions, renovations, infrastructure and more. 

“We are proud that this school district has been frugal and smart in developing facilities over the years,” said Scott Wieskamp, director of Facilities and Maintenance at LPS. 

The document draft discussed Tuesday – which is only an introduction for discussion – identified more than $486 million in facility and infrastructure needs in the school district. The 10-year plan is meant to identify all needs, Wieskamp said, but stressed that these projects are not yet funded.   

The 10-year draft identified a group of possible priorities for the next decade that mostly target student growth, including:

  •  Four elementary schools added to almost every quadrant of the city: south, southeast, northeast and northwest Lincoln (at a cost of about $20 million per elementary school).
  •  Two middle schools added to: south and northeast Lincoln (at a cost of about $42 million per school).
  •  Adding high school space in some form (such as a traditional high school, which costs about $79 million, and/or high school focus programs, e-learning, other high school concepts and programs).
  •  Renovations to accommodate changing curriculum at existing middle and high schools.
  •  Extensive renovations and additions of geothermal heating/cooling at Everett Elementary School and Park Middle School.
  •  Potential accommodation for early childhood additions at LPS.

Other “tiers” of needs include:

  •  Significant updates and renovations at Campbell, Cavett, Maxey and Roper elementary schools, as well as Lux and Scott middle schools.
  •  Various renovations at Lincoln High, Lincoln East, Lincoln Northeast and Lincoln Southeast high schools.
  •  A variety of additions and renovations to 10 elementary schools and six middle schools.
  •  Adding an eight-lane swimming pool to Lincoln East High (the only LPS high school without an eight-lane competitive pool).
  •  A weight room addition to Lincoln Southeast.
  •  An indoor/outdoor activities/athletics fieldhouse facility for practice (not a competitive arena) serving LPS staff and students.
  •  Completing a data center/generator at LPS District Office.
  •  Replacing the Yankee Hill facility, which houses high school students with behavior needs.

The Plan also includes a potential $38 million in infrastructure costs that includes items such as roof replacement, windows, flooring, basics in playground equipment, parking lot paving, etc.  “We look at infrastructure costs as protecting our investment,” Wieskamp said.  “We have a great preventative maintenance program….and maintaining our buildings is just as important as building a new building to accommodate kids.”

The LPS 10-Year Facilities and Infrastructure document was last completely updated in December, 2013 prior to the February 2014 bond issue.  The process for updating the plan will involve at least one or two more work sessions – and possibly more. 

BOARD MEETING Highlights 

Several significant grants approved

The Board of Education approved two grant applications:

  •  LPS will submit a grant to the Nebraska Department of Education to support implementation of key innovative strategies meant to redesign middle schools. The grant application request will include approximately $2 million over a three-year period. The money will fund a project called Planting the Seeds of Innovation in Middle School, which seeks to increase engagement and achievement among middle school students through a three-pronged strategy: (1) a schoolwide shift to design-based learning and an innovation mindset, (2) a transformation in design and function of learning environments, and (3) schoolwide professional development with innovative industry leaders in STEM and education fields. The project will initially target Goodrich and Moore middle schools.
  •  LPS will submit a grant to the Woods Charitable Fund to support districtwide implementation of a University of Nebraska-Lincoln-developed bullying intervention program. The grant application request will include an average of $380,000 per year for five years, totaling approximately $1.9 million. LPS would like to expand its partnership with UNL’s Department of Educational Psychology to increase utilization of a successful bullying intervention program across the district.

Policy changes proposed 
The Board heard proposed changes in policies related to Community Relations including distribution of community service materials, and use of students for non-school projects.  The changes will be approved at the Jan. 10 meeting.

United Way proposal

The Board of Education considered the submission of a proposal to United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County to support the Two Generation Family Literacy Program in the amount of approximately $30,000 for a one-year funding cycle.  The evidence-based Family Literacy model followed by LPS includes the following four components:

  • Adult Education Instruction—provided through high quality ESL classes
  • Children's Education—teaching literacy through a viable district curriculum
  • Parent and Child Together Time
  • Parenting Classes

 The Board will vote final approval at the Jan. 10 meeting.

Strategic Plan update

Everyone is encouraged to participate in the ongoing strategic planning process – online for about one more week – by taking the survey at:http://www.lps.org/strategicplan/

Staff and Student Celebrations

A Student Celebration at the Board of Education meeting recognized one of the many generous activities at Lincoln Public Schools. As part of the broaderCommunity OutReach program at Irving Middle School – Irving science and social studies teacher Kate Larson presents her students with something called theActs of Kindness Challenge. Presenters Tuesday included Irving teacher Kate Larson and Irving sixth grade students: Maude Kilmer, Graceyn Anderson, Nick Herbin and Adrianna Ambrocio.

The Board also noted two Staff Celebrations, recognizing Lorinda Rice, curriculum specialist for Visual Art in Lincoln Public Schools, honored with the State Supervision and Administration Award by the Nebraska Art Teachers Association; and Jocelyn Lippincott Reiss, art teacher at Lincoln North Star High School, named the State Secondary Art Teacher of the Year by the Nebraska Art Teachers Association.

 

Posted on December 13, 2016


Belmont, Southwest win film festival

The Lincoln Public Schools PBiS hosted it's fourth annual Film Festival to give schools a way to inform and promote positive behaviors through video.

Schools were asked to submit a short video that showcased positive behaviors and outlined expectations, and staff from the Lincoln Public Schools District Office attended the festival and voted for the videos that met guidelines. 

Lincoln Southwest won the secondary division, with Park Middle School winning second place. Belmont Elementary won the elementary division, with Hartley Elementary as runner up. Their videos will be sent on to the national competition.

 

 

Posted on December 13, 2016


LPS high school graduation rate climbs: Focus on each student

The high school graduation rate for for the class of 2016 at Lincoln Public Schools saw an increase, thanks to LPS high schools working hard to focus on every individual student and making sure they are successful through creative, proactive programs, according to officials at LPS.

Steve Joel, superintendent of LPS, noted: “I want to call out the amazing work of our educators and those that support the work in the school district's classrooms for their continued focus on helping students find success.  While the work is getting tougher as we deal with unprecedented growth in overall numbers and in populations that require many additional supports, we have maintained high school graduation as a high priority.  Thanks go as well to Lincoln Board of Education members who have prioritized funds for programs and interventions designed to lift up students who are struggling. We will not rest until all of our students are successful.”

Jane Stavem, associate superintendent for Instruction at LPS, continued: “Increasing our graduation rate continues to be a focus for our school district, because we believe it is an essential milestone.  Each of our high schools has made a concerted effort in tracking every student...We know our students as individuals, not numbers.  We know their faces, their strengths, their challenges.  We know that every single kid counts.”

LPS uses two sets of data for evaluating and assessing the high school graduation rate in the school district – using formulas that are slightly different – both released Friday.  For more than 20 years, LPS has followed the general rule of calculating graduation rates for students who start as ninth graders in the school district and graduate in four years on time.  That means 85.6 percent of the students in the class of 2016 who started at LPS as ninth graders – and did not move away – graduated on time in four years, compared to 85.2 percent the previous year. (That compares to a graduation rate of 80.1 percent at LPS more than five years ago.) When you look at actual numbers, 47 more students graduated from LPS in 2016 compared to 2015.

The official graduation rate in Nebraska and across the country is what is called the “on-time” rate – students who graduate in four years – but LPS also closely tracks students who graduate in five years (88.7 percent for the most recent numbers), and six years (91.9 percent).

Those five- and six-year graduation numbers are vital to LPS – because we believe those kids are just as important as kids who graduate on time, said Pat Hunter-Pirtle, director of Secondary Instruction.  “You’d be amazed at the way our principals – in high schools of 2,000 and more students – know each kid.”

Sarah Salem, director of Continuous Improvement and Professional Learning, agreed: “I think one of things LPS has been doing really well – is making big schools feel smaller...It is a challenge, but I think we are successfully taking huge comprehensive high schools and identifying kids who need the most support.  One program might capture these ten kids…one will capture these eight…And we are teaching all our kids about the value of grit, that it’s ok to make mistakes, that you have to persevere.  That is the mindset throughout the school district.”

Stavem said there is no one magic program, but instead a mix of proactive and reactive systems: “We help kids up front and position them well to be successful…We also watch them closely and intervene as quickly as possible – and in the right ways – to help kids get back on track quickly if they start to veer.  It is about being alert and aware, and having the right tools.  It is not about waiting for a kid to walk into the counseling office, but looking at data every single day and keeping close tabs. I think that has been a game changer.”

She stressed the graduation rate is not just about high school: “Children in grade school know when they are graduating from high school, and that impacts the way they see their future. Our feeder middle schools are working really hard on successful transitions.”

Jadi Miller, director of Curriculum, gave an example: LPS identified that struggling students in high school often have trouble with the Oral Communications course. So eighth graders in targeted middle schools are now offered the opportunity to take that class during summer school – with the first half set in their home middle school and the second half in their new high schools.  “They are more likely to pass the class, of course, but they also have more confidence when they start high school.  They have a better sense of navigating the new school.”

Graduation numbers for school districts across the state released Friday by the Nebraska State Department of Education use a slightly different calculation formula. The state includes students who transfer into high school after ninth grade begins: a formula that gives LPS an 83.2 percent graduation rate, up from 82.2 percent the previous year.  The state also released numbers for students who graduated in five years (86.2 percent), six years (89.4 percent) and seven year (90.2 percent).  LPS officials note the difference in calculations is understandable: Students who arrive and transfer into LPS later in their school experience – tend to have a greater number of challenges and therefore may graduate at a lower rate.

Our school district and community must understand that increasing the LPS graduation rate will continue to get harder, Stavem said.  “We are also increasing our student enrollment, as well as the percentages of students who have identified needs and challenges – at the same time our graduation requirements become more and more rigorous.”  Seniors in the last few years have been the first to graduate with new and more rigorous graduation requirements moving from 230 to 245 credits. 

She noted the incredible support and partnership in this community.  “We live in a community that offers support for our students, and embraces our graduation goal,” Stavem continued.  “It really does take multiple initiatives and multiple partners to get that needle to move. And we are moving it.”    

Posted on December 09, 2016


Transfer workshops for all teachers

Human Resources will be holding a transfer workshop for all certified teachers who may be interested in a school transfer for the 2017-2018 school year. Dr. Kay Byers and Dr. Nicole Regan will share information on the transfer timeline and transfer process.

December 12 and 14, 4 - 5:30 p.m. in the Board Room at LPSDO

January 11, from 4-5:30 p.m. in room 204 at LPSDO

Posted on December 07, 2016


Upcoming Retirement Planning Workshops

Retirement Planning sessions have been scheduled by Human Resources for staff considering retirement at the end of the 2016-17 school year or prior to September, 2017.  If you are planning to retire next spring/summer, we urge you to attend.  If you have not made up your mind on when you are retiring but know it will be in the next few years, the workshop will provide information about the retirement process.

Administrators:  Monday, December 12, 2016 - 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. - District Office, Lower Level, Lab A

Certificated Staff:  Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. and Thursday, January 19, 2016 - 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. (Same session repeated.)  District Office, First Floor, Board Room

Classified Staff:  Wednesday, February 1, 2017 - 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. and Thursday, February 2, 2017 - 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. (Same session repeated.)  District Office, First Floor, Board Room

During the workshops, we will discuss when your benefits end and how to continue health, dental and/or other insurance benefits (Direct Bill and COBRA), the non-elective 403(b) procedures, pay for leave, how/when to apply for Nebraska school retirement (NPERS), etc.

Please RSVP to Nancy Harter (nharter@lps.org) if you plan to attend and which session in order that we have enough information packets.

 

Posted on December 07, 2016


LPSAOP teams up with City Impact to make a difference in the community

Twenty-nine members of the Lincoln Public Schools Association of Office Professionals and family volunteered at City Impact - Gifts of Love on December 5.

Gifts of Love offers need-qualified families the opportunity to purchase gifts at discount prices, helping to maintain ownership and dignity. 

Proceeds from the store further City Impact's programs for under-resourced youth and families. The Gift of Love Store's success is dependent on donations and volunteers. It takes over 1,500 volunteers to make the Gifts of Love Store and donations are still being accepted at City Impact, 1035 N 33rd Street.  Volunteer duties included inventory for the gifts, and decorating.

Posted on December 07, 2016


Hahn named next principal at Culler Middle School

Michaela Hahn will be the next principal at Culler Middle School, 5201 Vine Street, starting in January 2017.

Hahn is currently an associate principal at Lincoln Northeast High School, where she has been since 2000. At Culler, she will replace Gary Czapla, who will be the first principal at Moore Middle School, 8700 Yankee Woods Drive, set to open to the fall of 2017.

Lincoln Public Schools announced the decision on Wednesday. Eric Weber, associate superintendent for Lincoln Public Schools, said Hahn is noted for commitment to staff, students and families.

"Michaela will be a wonderful addition to the Culler family,” Weber said. “She brings great energy, passion and experience to Culler as well as a strong understanding of the community and the many opportunities that will help Culler continue to succeed going forward."

In a message for Culler families, Hahn said:

“I have had the great fortune of spending most of my professional life working with students and families in the Northeast part of town. I love the culture of pride and tradition and am beyond thrilled to get the opportunity to serve the students, parents and teachers at Culler. It is an incredibly strong school and I look forward to helping that tradition of excellence continue!”

Hahn began at Northeast in 2000 as a special education teacher and department chair, before becoming a special education coordinator in 2003, and an associate principal in 2011. She graduated from the University of Nebraska at Kearney, earned a master’s degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and is in the process of earning her superintendency endorsement. Hahn also completed her administrative practicum at Culler in 2005.

While at Northeast, Hahn was worked on various projects including graduation requirement committee, adaptive schools training and secondary technology advisory committee, among others.

Posted on December 07, 2016


Middle school students to present research at free Morrill Hall event

Students at Community Learning Centers at three middle schools in Lincoln Public Schools are hosting a 'Sunday with a Junior Scientist' in Morrill Hall. The Museum is offering free admission that day, Dec. 11 from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Park, Culler and Dawes CLC program students are the host scientists sharing their research information that they have been hard at work on the past few months.

The activities will focus on topics of animal behavior including migration, reptile feeding patterns, mimicry, mutualism, plus more.  Mentored by University of Nebraska-Lincoln undergraduate and graduate students, the LPS students have been hard at work during the fall semester researching and developing activities as part of a year-long initiative led by Dr. Eileen Hebets, biological sciences professor at UNL.

The Malone Center, Cedars, Boys and Girls Club and Willard Community Center have also contributed to the success of this program.

This partnership provides a multigenerational approach to educational outreach in the content area of natural sciences. UNL students receive formal instruction by Dr. Hebets and invited colleagues from across campus on how to construct and deliver effective informal science activities. The structure pairs trained UNL students, as after school science club leaders, with middle school students in the CLCs. These middle school students and CLC staff, in turn, connect with elementary students in additional joint elementary/middle

These middle school students and CLC staff, in turn, connect with elementary students in additional joint elementary/middle after-school science clubs. This vertically integrated peer instruction design leads to a richer learning experience for all students, and ultimately a broader awareness of the natural sciences.

Posted on December 06, 2016


Southwest wrestling bringing back 'Takedowns for the Troops'

The wrestling team at Lincoln Southwest High School will host Lincoln Northeast High School for its third annual Takedowns for the Troops. The event, scheduled for 6 p.m., December 14 at Southwest High School, 7001 S. 14th St., will raise money for the Disabled American Veterans group. Other groups involved in the event include the Lincoln Public Schools Junior ROTC, Dwight American Legion Post 110, LSW Choir and Band, and Emeralds Dance Team.

In 2013, Lincoln Southwest Wrestling initiated a community involvement project called “Takedowns for the Troops.”  Our team celebrates this event in conjunction with Senior Night and Alumni Recognition Night.  LSW Wrestling is proud to be the first team in Lincoln to undertake a community involvement event of this magnitude.  Last year, LSW Wrestling was able to raise over $4,500 for the Disabled American Veterans.

The event will continue to accept donations in the form of acknowledgements and memorials. Names will be displayed as part of our pre-match ceremony. If you would like to acknowledge or memorialize an active, retired, or deceased member of the armed forces, please send name, military branch, and any applicable overseas service with cash or check (made to LSW Boosters) to:

Aaron Finley

T4T Acknowledgements/Memorials

7001 S. 14th St.

Lincoln, NE 68512

Questions?  Contact coach Finley at 402-436-1306 or via email at afinley@lps.org

Posted on November 30, 2016


Lincoln Public Schools: Highlights of 11/22 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

Lincoln Public Schools: Highlights of 11/22 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

LPS: Highlights of 11/22 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

The Lincoln Board of Education held a regular meeting on Tuesday, November 22 at Lincoln Public Schools District Office, 5905 O St. The Board will hold its next meeting Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 6 p.m.

BOARD MEETING Highlights

Several significant grants proposed

The Board of Education heard discussion of three proposed grant applications:

  • LPS proposed submission to the Nebraska Department of Education to support implementation of key innovative strategies meant to redesign middle schools. The grant application request will include approximately $2 million over a three-year period.

LPS would like to propose a project called Planting the Seeds of Innovation in Middle School, which seeks to increase engagement and achievement among middle school students through a three-pronged strategy: (1) a schoolwide shift to design-based learning and an innovation mindset, (2) a transformation in design and function of learning environments, and (3) schoolwide professional development with innovative industry leaders in STEM and education fields.

If awarded, the project will initially target Goodrich and Moore middle schools—among the oldest and newest of LPS middle schools—to pilot these strategies. This will be followed by a phasing in of the remaining 10 middle schools over the three-year period, being mindful of the need for equitable distribution of resources throughout the district.

“We have seeds sewn all across our district with innovation,” said Jane Stavem, associate superintendent for Instruction at LPS. “We have deployed Chromebooks, given people initial tools…and there are more ideas that people are coming up with…We are looking at: How do we provide some engaging opportunities for students that go beyond what we’ve ever done?”

  • LPS proposed submission to Woods Charitable Fund to support districtwide implementation of a University of Nebraska-Lincoln-developed bullying intervention program. The grant application request will include an average of $380,000 per year for five years, totaling approximately $1.9 million. LPS would like to expand its partnership with UNL’s Department of Educational Psychology to increase utilization of a successful bullying intervention program across the district.

Implemented on a very small scale since 2005 – limited due to lack of funding and trained personnel to carry out the intervention – UNL’s Targeted Bullying Intervention Program has changed behaviors and decreased office referrals among approximately 200 students. This proposal would allow LPS to increase the use of the program across the district over five years, by training additional UNL graduate students to work with identified students, concentrating first on middle schools and then expanding to elementary and high schools

National data suggests that middle school students are at greatest risk for involvement in bullying, and that perpetrators and victims actually share many risk factors, including depression, anxiety and poor self-concept.

  • LPS proposed submission of a federally-funded grant application to the Nebraska Department of Education.  The total grant amount over a five-year period is projected to be $352,176. In years four and five, grant funds will step down (year four to 80 percent, year five to 60 percent of initial grant funding).  Community partnerships will contribute resources to meet the difference.

This 21st Century Community Learning Center grant application is a new funding grant for Campbell Elementary School.  This grant in partnership with United Way of Lincoln, will bring necessary resources and support to establish Campbell as a CLC school.  It is projected that approximately 100 students will be impacted by programs at this CLC school.

The following program goals will guide the program design and delivery: Goal 1: Improve student learning performance in one or more core academic areas; Goal 2: Increase social benefits and improve behavior; and Goal 3: Increase family and community involvement in schools.

The Board will vote approval for these grant applications at the Dec. 13 meeting.

Policy changes approved
The Board approved proposals for several changes in policy governing Board operating procedures: Meetings, and time and place of meetings.

Kitchen equipment for new Moore Middle School

The Board approved the purchase of $563,000 worth of kitchen equipment for the new Marilyn Moore Middle School (opening in the fall of 2017). The low bidder was Hockenbergs from Omaha.

Bond issue series

The community approved a bond issue in February, 2014 – and as a result in April of 2014, $120 million of bonds were issued.  The spend-down schedule indicates the majority of these funds will be expended in December 2016.  The Board of Education’s Finance Committee has recommended the remaining $33.3 million of the original authorization be issued for the second issuance of bonds – for the remaining LPS construction projects – no later than Feb. 15, 2017. The date of final maturity of the bonds shall not be later than January 31, 2022. The Board Tuesday voted approval of this issuance.

Strategic Plan update

Everyone is encouraged to participate in the ongoing strategic planning process – by taking the online survey at: http://www.lps.org/strategicplan/

Staff and Student Celebrations

A Student Celebration at the Board of Education meeting recognized the role of students who participate in the school district’s award-winning sustainability program. Presenting were: Brittney Albin, sustainability coordinator at LPS; and members of the Sheridan Elementary School Green Team: Annika Srivastav, third grade; Grover Korn, fourth; Gibby Chapman, fifth; and Leighton Schmit, fifth.

The Board also recognized LPS employees who have achieved the goal of 25-years of professional service to the youth of Lincoln and Lincoln Public Schools:

  1. Ardella Anderson
  2. Sylvia Bailey
  3. James Baker
  4. Sharon Barnes
  5. Diana Bauer
  6. Ruth Beechley
  7. Rita Bennett
  8. Chad Blatchford
  9. Michelle Bohac
  10. Diane Brodd
  11. Gaylene Butterfield
  12. Ralph Calafiore
  13. Nancy Clare
  14. Kelly Dodd
  15. Susan Dougherty
  16. Scott Fischer
  17. Barbara (Barb) Fitzgerald
  18. Jennifer Fosler
  19. Keri Gasseling
  20. Ronald Gormley
  21. Whitney Haberlan
  22. Sheridan Harrington
  23. Darla Haugerud
  24. Rustin Hitz
  25. Kent Hoffart
  26. Kyla Jensby
  27. Nancy Jervey
  28. Melinda Johnson
  29. Brian Kabourek
  30. Elizabeth L. Kagan
  31. Sondra Kahler
  32. Mike Kapeller
  33. Jodon (Dondi) Kilgore
  34. Melissa Kingery
  35. Kathleen Kloefkorn
  36. Dave Knudsen
  37. Devon Kosmicki
  38. Mark Lago
  39. H. Kirk Langer
  40. Susan Larson
  41. Jay Lawson
  42. Peter John Lenz
  43. Deborah Lyon
  44. Catherine Martin
  45. Carol Mathias
  46. Michael McCuistion
  47. Shaunna Meyer
  48. Kim Miller
  49. Susan Monroe
  50. Kelly Morehouse
  51. Nancy Myers
  52. Stephanie Nantkes
  53. Darwin Nelson
  54. Jill Oestmann
  55. Diana Pasco
  56. Mark Patton
  57. Kay Paulsen
  58. Roxanne Petersen
  59. Deanna Priefert
  60. Russell Raatz
  61. Lorrilyn Rennings
  62. Allan Rezac
  63. Kelli-Anne Roeber Schoening
  64. Katharine A. Runge-Wobig
  65. Jacqueline Rush
  66. Shirley Sabin
  67. Diane Schneider
  68. Rolanda Scurlock
  69. Diane Slaby
  70. Kathryn Slattery
  71. Angela Smail
  72. Jane Stedronsky
  73. Michal P. Sterns
  74. Diane Swartzlander
  75. Marge Theel
  76. Brent Toalson
  77. Russ Uhing
  78. William (Bill) Wendling
  79. Cheryl Wilkins
  80. Dawn Wright

 

 

 

Posted on November 22, 2016


Giving a book, getting a smile

Every first and second grader in Lincoln Public Schools and those in parochial schools will receive their very own book thanks to the efforts of the Lincoln Education Association, KFOR, and Raising Canes. Close to 7,000 books in total will be distributed during the 2016 Harvest of Books campaign.

Founded in 1997 by Dan Studer, former Lincoln Education Association President, the Harvest of Books Inc., is a program developed to help promote a life-long love of reading for children. There have been close to 170,000 books distributed through the 20 year program.

Posted on November 22, 2016


Recent Items