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EdNotes Express

Lincoln Public Schools Communication Services continues to look for the most effective way to provide you with information.  EdNotes is written and published specifically for the faculty and staff of Lincoln Public Schools.

If you have information you would like to include, please email Mary Kay Roth at mkroth@lps.org.

Park MS hosting College to career night < New

College fairs aren't unusual, but how about one for middle school students?

Park Middle School is hosting College to Career Night in its gym from 4 to 6 p.m. on Nov. 18.

Topics include:

  • Career Exploration
  • Admission Process and Requirements
  • College Selection
  • Application Process
  • Understanding Costs – Cost of Attendance
  • Scholarships

Posted on October 31, 2014


LYS hosting Nov. 9 concert < New

The Lincoln Youth Symphony, under the direction of Clark Potter, conductor, will host a free concert SundayNovember 9, at 3 p.m. at Southwest High School Auditorium. 
 
The concert is titled 'A Russian Festival of Song!' with Music by Russian nationalist composers, all taken from operas or derived from songs. 
 
Pieces include: 
  • Kabalevsky: Overture to Colas Bruegnon
  • Liadov: Eight Russian Folks Songs
  • Rachmaninoff:  Vocalise
  • Borodin: Polovetsian  Dances from Prince Igor
The Borodin piece is the highlight of the program, as a chorus of 200 from five local high schools will lend their voices to the piece.

Posted on October 31, 2014


Student Vote 2014: LPS students elect Ricketts and approve minimum wage < Updated

Results Available Here

Republican candidate Pete Ricketts would be governor – the minimum wage would pass – and Republican Ben Sasse would be Nebraska’s next new U.S. Senator – if Lincoln Public Schools students ruled the world.

Student Vote 2014 happened at LPS Thursday with more than 20,000 students casting votes on their own version of Election Day: LPS students along with students from Lincoln Christian schools and Elmwood-Murdock schools.

"Student Vote gives our students a chance to exercise one of the more fundamental American rights: the right to vote," said Randy Ernst, curriculum specialist for Social Studies. "And while the tendency for some will be to focus on who won, we at LPS focus on the process of what it takes to be an informed and active participant in the democratic process. Student Vote is good citizenship in action."

Students in the higher elementary grades, middle and high school students voted – some on computers, others using paper ballots – sharing their views on everything from governor and attorney general to whether Nebraska should boost the minimum wage.

Student Vote 2014 totals

Governor

Pete Ricketts, Republican: 10, 478

Chuck Hassebrook, Democratic: 5,690

Mark Elworth Jr. Libertarian: 3,253

Nebraska Minimum Wage Increase (incrementally increase the state’s hourly minimum wage to $9 by Jan. 1, 2016)

For: 13,684

Against: 5,039

Nebraska Senator

Ben Sasse, Republican: 11,079

Dave Domina, Democratic: 4,369

Jim Jenkins, Independent: 1,163

Todd Watson, Independent: 2,858

Nebraska District 1 Representative/House of Representatives

Jeff Fortenberry, Republican: 11,908

Dennis Crawford, Democratic: 7,112

Secretary of State

John Gale, Republican: 10,052

Ben Backus, Democratic: 8,447

State Treasurer

Don Stenberg, Republican: 8,547

Michael J. O’hara, Democratic: 5,194

Michael Knebel, Libertarian: 5,139

Attorney General

Janet Stewart, Democratic: 10,829

Doug Peterson, Republican: 8,150

 

 

 

 

Posted on October 31, 2014


Highlights of Oct. 28 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

Highlights of Oct. 28 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

The Lincoln Board of Education met for a regular Board meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 28 at LPS District Office, 5905 O St. The next Board meeting is set for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11.

New LPS school names honor early childhood advocate, educator, judge

The Lincoln Board of Education Tuesday approved three names: for a new elementary and middle school, and a soon-to-be renovated facility at 1801 S. 40th St. – recommendations passed on by the Lincoln Public Schools Community Naming Committee.

The names are:

  • Sally G. Wysong Elementary School, named after a long-time early childhood advocate who ran the Meadowlane daycare/preschool, and later served on the Lincoln Board of Education.
  • Marilyn Moore Middle School, named after the former Associate Superintendent for Instruction at LPS, a life-long educator who gave her career to the students of LPS.
  • Bill Nuernberger Education Center, named after the first separate juvenile judge for Lancaster County, a man who advocated that children and young people needed a separate court.

The new elementary and middle school will both be located in southeast Lincoln: The elementary school will open in the fall of 2016; the middle school will open in the fall of 2017. The renovated facility – at 1801 S. 40th St. and previous home to the Bryan Focus Program – will soon provide a home for middle school students who need additional behavior, emotional and social support.

School libraries

Librarians today play a critical role in what’s happening in our schools, LPS Superintendent Steve Joel said, introducing Mary Reiman, director of Library Media Services.

Reiman gave an update of the role of “the 21st century librarians…We really don’t look much like the librarians of your childhood.

Library media specialists focus on developing four major 21st century skills in students:

  • Collaboration.
  • Communication.
  • Creativity: Building, designing, inventing.
  • Critical thinking and problem solving.

Why is digital conversion so important?

Reiman: “We have the opportunity to open up a world of learning that we have never had the capacity to do before…Our job is to help our students find the best information possible…It is extremely exciting – and, it seems to me, to be very, very magical.”

Board recognition

The Board of Education recognized Melissa Pilney, a French teacher at Lefler Middle School and Lincoln North Star High School, honored by the Nebraska International Languages Association as the recipient of the 2014 Outstanding New World Language Award.

Public comments and Superintendent update

Community citizens testified about professional development at LPS related to transgender, gender nonconforming and gender conforming students.

LPS Superintendent Steve Joel took a moment to comment on the issue.

Joel’s complete statement follows:

“Our School District has gone through a valuable learning experience over the past month. I appreciate all those who have offered input, and I would like to say a few words of perspective and reflection.

First, I’d like to underline something that I know for sure. At Lincoln Public Schools we are committed to all students – and all means all. That’s something I knew long before a month ago, but I’m proud of how our staff and our Board of Education have united over the last few weeks to reinforce that core mission.

Lincoln Public Schools welcomes every student who walks through our doors and is committed to providing them with the very best education we can.

Something else I know for sure: Our school district is committed to cultural proficiency – work to gain a better understanding of children and adults from diverse backgrounds so we can establish positive relationships with all. In fact, much of what we do in teaching and learning must be seen through the lens of cultural proficiency. This isn’t new, it has been a part of LPS for a number of years.

We are educationally stronger when we provide information and guidance through professional development to help staff tune in to the needs of all students. These materials are not shared with students nor are they shared in a classroom setting. These are materials that help our educators do a better job of teaching. In fact, every young person has the right to have informed, educated, and compassionate teachers.

We also know that some topics in cultural proficiency are very sensitive and make us uncomfortable. While we would never expect any member of our staff to alter their personal beliefs or values, we do expect that they will create welcoming classrooms – always.

Over the past month, we have had powerful conversations with citizens, staff and administrators who took valuable time to talk with us – to tell us they care about these issues – parents with varied opinions – parents who are all clearly committed to all children. I appreciate everyone who sent letters, emails, text messages, and spoke to us with civility. We are all stronger because of these healthy discussions.

We value your words. We listened. And, I believe we learned from the various perspectives.

As we move forward in our continuing journey of cultural proficiency, we need to be very cognizant of the materials we are using. We need to make sure our resources are appropriate, purposeful, and clear. These documents were not, and I have directed that they be removed from our schools.

I trust our educators and value their professional judgment. We must do our very best to make sure the materials we use in professional development are aligned with our policies and best practices.

We are reinforcing important guidance with all our administrators, principals, teachers, and staff.

First…we must all be increasingly aware it’s a new world out there – where materials can be posted on the web – in social media – sometimes without explanation or context. Our handouts and resources must be able to stand alone with clarity.

Second…It is appropriate to utilize experts when we are learning about a topic that is new to us. However, before we further distribute information from guest speakers, we need to ensure all those materials are consistent with district policies and best practices.

Finally…in the event a subject matter or resource materials may cause questions or concerns among staff or community – I am asking our staff to seek a review from school and district leadership. In the event that questions continue to persist, I am asking our LPS Cultural Proficiency Implementation Advisory Steering Committee to appraise the materials and lend guidance.

LPS has an over-arching policy of equity and non-discrimination. LPS does not and will not discourage the terminology “boys and girls” when referring to students, but LPS does and will promote a safe environment that recognizes individual differences so that 39,000 students can feel included, welcomed and successful. That is what makes me proud of our staff, our district and ultimately our results.”

 

 

Posted on October 28, 2014


Foundation for LPS accepting nominees for educator awards

The Foundation for Lincoln Public Schools would like to recognize teachers who go above and beyond and use creative and innovative ways to better classroom learning.

The public can nominate a teacher, principal or other education professional for the 2015 Educator Awards.

  • Florence J. Clark Middle School Award - Two $3,000 awards to recognize outstanding middle school teachers
  • Helen Krieger Outstanding Healthcare Provider Award - $1,000 to a healthcare provider
  • John Prasch Health and Physical Fitness Award -$1,000 to an educator who promotes health and physical fitness
  • Leola Bullock Multicultural Award - LPS employee who fosters understanding of our multicultural society
  • Marian Battey Andersen and Charles Wheaton Battey Outstanding Teacher Award - $1,200 award to recognize leadership at Sheridan Elementary, Irving Middle School, or Lincoln High School
  • Marie Bourke Leadership Award - $1,000 to an LPS principal
  • Mike Troester Educator Award - $300 to a Southeast High School educator
  • Myrtle Clark Educator Award - $1,000 to a mathematics teacher
  • Nancy Muehlhausen Counseling Award - $1,000 to an educator accepted into a Master’s level school counseling program, or a current counselor in need of funds for professional development
  • R.L. Fredstrom Award - $1,000 to a teacher or coordinator who has shown outstanding leadership qualities
  • Ruth Eickman Award - $250 to an early childhood educator
  • Union Bank & Trust Award - $750 to educators who find creative ways to incorporate financial literacy into the classroom setting
  • Victor Vaughan Memorial Award - $3,200 to support a teacher project dedicated to special education students

Nominations & Applications are due by November 26.

To nominate and see a description of each educator award, visit foundationforlps.org/EducatorAwards.

Posted on October 28, 2014


Event to raise funds for LPS instrument fee waiver program

The Capital Jazz Society will host a fundraiser tribute to late Lincoln trumpet icon Mac McCune on TuesdayNovember 11, 2014, 7:30 pm at Vega, 350 Canopy St., #220 in the Historic Haymarket. Mac’s son, Dr. Bryan McCune on trumpet, will lead the extravaganza. This installment of the Capital Jazz Series will also feature performances by a host of Lincoln musicians drawing from favorite songs of McCune's extensive repertoire, including an homage to the legendary Aku Tiki years.  Suggested donation is $10. Proceeds will go to the Lincoln Public Schools Instrument Fee Waiver program.  Details at http://www.artsincorporated.org/cjs/

Posted on October 28, 2014


Career Academy announces information sessions for students, families

View the new website to learn more about TCA

The first public information session for The Career Academy will be held on Oct. 27, 2014 at Lincoln East High School - followed by similar sessions at each Lincoln Public Schools high school.  The new Career Academy program, of Lincoln Public Schools and Southeast Community College, will open in August 2015 at a site under construction near SCC at 86th Street and College Park Road.

Families and students in middle and high school interested in learning about high school, college and career opportunities through The Career Academy are invited to attend.

Each hour-long session begins at 7 p.m., with a short presentation opening the event, followed by an open Q&A session:

  • Monday, Oct. 27 - Lincoln East cafeteria
  • Tuesday, Oct. 28 - Lincoln Southwest auditorium
  • Thursday, Oct. 30 - Lincoln High theater
  • Monday, Nov. 10 - Lincoln North Star auditorium
  • Tuesday, Nov. 11 - Lincoln Northeast commons
  • Tuesday, Nov. 18 - Lincoln Southeast commons 

The Career Academy will feature 16 career pathways, engaging instruction, hands-on experiences and real-life opportunities in and outside the classroom. Juniors and seniors will attend TCA for two hours a day, earn high school and SCC credits through dual credit courses, and will have a distinct advantage on applications for jobs, internships, scholarships and/or college.

For more information, call director Dan Hohensee at 402-436-1787 or visit www.thecareer.academy.

Posted on October 27, 2014


Artist's rendering of LHS (time-lapse video), celebrating 100 years at 2229 J St.

Lincoln High School is in its 100th year at 2229 J Street. LPS graphic artist Julie Lemons drew a rendering of the front of the school.

Posted on October 24, 2014


Looking beyond labels to student learning

LPS has high standards for students: Looks beyond latest federal ‘labels’ to improve student learning 

Lincoln Public Schools continues to set high standards while aiming to ensure every child succeeds and flourishes in school, despite what most local and national education officials consider an outdated and ineffective No Child Left Behind (NCLB) system that continues to label schools, according to Steve Joel superintendent of LPS.

“Regardless of federal and state accountability standards calling for 100 percent proficiency for all students, LPS staff members continue to focus on helping students achieve,” Joel said.  “We want every child to succeed and will continue to make this our absolute highest priority.”

Like almost all school districts in Nebraska, LPS did not meet what are called the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals for 2014 as required by NCLB. These reports measure the school district’s performance in terms of the percentage of students who are at or above state-defined academic standard goals in major academic areas.

For schools to meet AYP this year, 100 percent of all students – regardless of special needs, English language mastery, or other life-impacting circumstances – must have met proficiency standards, explained Jane Stavem, associate superintendent of Instruction at LPS.

In fact, nearly every school in Nebraska will fail to meet these highly unrealistic standards for 2014 – and as a result many LPS schools may now be labeled “Not Met” or “Needs Improvement,” Stavem continued.

“The labels mask what is really important here,” Jadi Miller, director of Curriculum at LPS, said in response to the State of the Schools Report issued Friday.  “We look and focus on growth over time, improvement over time. Are we making a difference for kids?”

Miller stressed LPS strives to make sure that students, schools and the school district are generally trending in the right direction and showing continuous improvement – and that is exactly what is happening: ”Our teachers, administrators and staff members at LPS are doing excellent work – reflected in the achievement and accomplishments of our students.”

Stavem said that LPS pays great attention to valuable data – though little attention to federal labels that have become almost meaningless. “We look at trend lines, we look for improvement on a student by student basis.  LPS continues to find new ways to apply what the data can teach the school district.” 

“This year we are adding an internal layer of additional supports.  We study the data and look at the places we might need improvement and ask:  Where do we need to be more specific with curriculum support?  Instructional support?  We continue to add supports and interventions that are very intentional and specific.”

In addition, LPS continues to focus on its mission to ensure every child succeed and flourish in school, according to Bess Scott, director of Continuous Improvement and Professional Learning. “As educators we are fully committed to all students reaching their full potential and we are proud of the significant academic progress our students are making – as evidenced in increasing achievement scores district-wide, and our high school graduation rate.”

The State of the Schools Report publishes information – an overwhelming amount of numbers, labels and statistics – for all school districts across Nebraska. The Report includes achievement from the Nebraska State Accountability (NeSA) tests, federal accountability decisions and more. NeSA scores were released earlier this school year with results indicating LPS showed consistent increases over the previous year and were above state averages in most grade levels and subject areas. Graduation rates and state accountability rankings by graduation rates will be released in November.

Only schools receiving federal Title 1 funds are subject to the ramifications of the NCLB Act, and therefore some LPS students are eligible for free tutoring or possible transfer to another school. 

So what would a sound educational accountability system look like? 

Stavem said: “We would want a system that recognizes growth, improvement over time, a system reflective of achievement and adequate progress…A system that helps us understand where we need to focus our work.”

No Child Left Behind:  A few facts

The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act was signed into law in 2002 – and focused on an annual measure of student participation and achievement on statewide assessments and other indicators. 

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is the term No Child Left Behind uses to measure whether your child’s school has met a state’s reading, math and writing goals.  BY 2014, 100 percent  OF ALL STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO PASS STATE ASSESSMENTS.

The No Child Left Behind Act was signed into law on January 8, 2002.  This legislation expired on September 30, 2007, without new educational legislation approved by Congress to replace it.  

Posted on October 24, 2014


Reports that U.S. public education is failing are not true, and here's why

Rob McEntarffer has been involved in public education in some form his entire life: as a student, son of two parents involved in public education, a teacher himself, an assessment specialist and a parent of, currently, a Lefler Lion and a Randolph Roadrunner.

He's offended when people give broad generalizations about how public education in the United States is failing.

McEntarffer laid out his arguments - based on research - at a Learning Lunch at Lincoln Public Schools.

The first myth McEntarffer discussed was that the United States is lagging behind other countries in education.

He cited David Berliner, a statistician and writer, uncovered oddities in data in international test score comparison, where the U.S. is typically in the middle of the rankings.

The history of the international test ranks since the beginning has placed the United States in the middle of the pack. Berliner looked at test scores broken down by poverty, and found the U.S. ranks very well when poverty levels are near equal with other countries.

Also, not all countries include all students in testing.

Another myth McEntarffer tackled was "Our kids can't read or do math." These broad generalizations, he said, irritate him because they rely on broad statistitcs.

Education leaders in China, according to researcher Yong Zhao, aren't pleased with their own education system, even though they consistently rank near the top of international test scores. China's education leaders, Zhao says, worry about a lack of creativity, and the United States should not merely aim to replicate China's success on international tests.

Furthermore, McEntarffer said, National Assessment of Education Progress - a nationwide achievement test - shows that today's students have been getting better or at least holding its own since 1971.

The third myth McEntarffer discussed was that public education is getting worse, "The sky is falling," approach, he said.

Dozens and dozens of initiatives have been added to the mission of the public schools since 1900. Items like school lunch, school-mandated transportation, sex education, adult education, career education, safety education and more. And, McEntarffer said, public schools have taken them on, adding them to the basics: math, reading, science and social studies.

Research David Labaree noted, McEntarffer said, that the public expects schools to emphasize all students abilities and individual student success at the same time.

McEntarffer said to find the area of calm, below the storm of the 'sky is falling,' teachers and schools emphasize creativity and experiences for students.

LPS honors those places of calm, McEntarffer said, and he urged the audience to point out myths other people claim. Look for the details behind the big general number or test score, he said.

McEntarffer also gave this metaphor: If you enjoyed someone's soup, you would comment on the flavor and ingredients and so forth. But a student who writes an essay with many parts to consider, ends up with a single grade letter or number. That, he said, just doesn't make sense.

 

Posted on October 24, 2014


Local Foods Day includes lettuce grown in water

LPS Nutrition Services has partnered with several Nebraska growers to provide students with fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables. Today, Oct. 24, our school lunch menu is celebrating Local Food Day, and offering Smart Chicken drumsticks and Bibb lettuce grown right here in Nebraska. The Bibb lettuce will be used for salads, and is grown by Oak Ridge Farms in Ord. The greenhouse uses a method called hydroponics, where the lettuce grows in water and the plants receive the nutrients they need to grow without the use of soil.

 

Posted on October 24, 2014


Project Search puts students in job situations, then jobs

LPS students with disabilities are actively learning skills through Project Search, three 10-week rotations working for employers in Lincoln. Many have gone on to obtain employment, a key goal at the end of the student’s time in the program.

A Project Search Information Night will be from 6 to 7:30 tomorrow night at the Embassy Suites, 1040 P St. For more information, contact Mary Phillips at 402-436-1905 or Kim Hovendick at khovend@lps.org

The Lincoln Public Schools Project Search program is a yearlong internship providing opportunities for students who are 18-21 years of age with disabilities to learn and gain competitive job skills.  Along with Lincoln Public Schools; Embassy Suites – Lincoln, Nebraska VR, DHHS, Assistive Technology Partnership and Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired have partnered together to teach and encourage these selected students.

In addition to skill development in the work environment, Project Search students participate in dedicated classroom time.  This time is spent following the Project Search curriculum, which includes refining soft skills, problem solving and teamwork.

Posted on October 20, 2014


International Omaha offers field trip opportunities in April 2015

The International Omaha is offering fields trips with emphsis on exhibits and hands-on opportunities at an expo in April 2015. For complete information, including contact information, read their flyer.

Posted on October 20, 2014


Morley students take the lead in tracking, reducing tardies

Teachers at Morley Elementary School have the students keep track of the tardies during the week. On Friday, one student writes the name of the teacher and the number of tardies for the week on a sticky note. The sticky note gets hung on a window in the front hall. Then two fifth-graders total everything and fill in the chart. Each class with no tardies for the week hangs a sign on their door.

Posted on October 16, 2014


Lincoln’s Symphony Orchestra Presents 'Across the Sea'

World renowned harpist, Alice Giles, joins Lincoln’s Symphony Orchestra for “Across the Sea,” Sunday, October 26 at 5 p.m. at the Lied Center for Performing Arts.

Alice Giles is praised by composer Luciano Berio as “The most intelligent, sensitive and technically accomplished harpist I have ever met.” Giles gained international notice after winning the 8th Israel International Harp Contest at age 21, and continued to add to her rich biography with awards, premieres, recordings, and reputable teaching experience.

Giles is actively involved in commissioning and performing new music, and she will be performing modern composer Bright Sheng’s Never Far Away. This piece showcases the harp’s capacity not just for the ethereal, but also the dramatic, and contains musical references to traditional Chinese music. Explaining the title of the piece, Sheng writes, “Never Far Away is a reference to an old saying, ’If your native culture is still the inspiration of your work, you are never far away from your motherland.’”


The rest of the program features Impressionistic music, starting with Jacques Ibert’s Escales, or “Ports of Call,” inspired by the composer’s time in the Mediterranean. After intermission, LSO will perform Ravel’s Rapsodie Espagnole, a piece influenced by the musical heritage of his mother. The concert ends with La Mer, or The Sea, Debussy’s famous Three Symphonic Sketches for Orchestra.


“I’m looking forward to an evening of dazzling and dramatic music inspired by different countries and oceans,” says Music Director Edward Polochick, “and I believe everyone will really be blown away by Alice’s talent. It is not every day you get to see a harp soloist, and such a gifted one at that.”


 
 

Posted on October 16, 2014


LNE staff support fellow teacher with surprise

Sharon Holliday, a teacher at Lincoln Northeast High School, received a surprise well-wishes event from the women of LNE (and some men of LNE, too). Holliday is undergoing treatments for cancer. She has been a teacher in Lincoln Public Schools for about 20 years, currently in the Family Consumer Sciences department at Northeast.

Posted on October 16, 2014


Fifth-graders invited to celebrate their mom with essay contest

Each year American Mothers, Inc.®, a non-profit organization that has honored outstanding mothers across the United States since 1935, conducts a 5th grade essay contest entitled, "What My Mother Means to Me."
 
Fifth-grade students are invited to participate.
 
The essay is to be 150 words or less (please see attached for details). The students that participate in the contest will be judged against other students from within the state. Awards and prizes are given to the first, second and third place winners of the state competition. The first place winner's essay from each state is forwarded to compete in the national contest. Awards and prizes are given to the first, second and third place winners of the national contest. We are pleased to have run this contest since 2004 and look forward to the students
from your school participating this year.
 
The essay contest officially begins August 15, 2014 and is not final until January 5, 2015.
For more information, see the flyer.

Posted on October 16, 2014


Highlights of Oct. 14 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

Highlights of Oct. 14 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

The Lincoln Board of Education met for a regular Board meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 14 at LPS District Office, 5905 O St. The next Board meeting is set for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 28.

Board of Education meeting highlights

New LPS school name recommendations

  • Sally G. Wysong Elementary School.
  • Marilyn Moore Middle School.
  • Bill Nuernberger Education Center.

The Lincoln Board of Education Tuesday considered those three names: for a new elementary and middle school, and a renovated facility at 1801 S. 40th St. – recommendations passed on by the Lincoln Public Schools Community Naming Committee. The Board will vote final approval at the Oct. 28 Board meeting.

“I cannot be more pleased at the suggestions – great work,” said Board member Don Mayhew.

The new elementary and middle school will both be located in southeast Lincoln: The elementary school will open in the fall of 2016; the middle school will open in the fall of 2017. The renovated facility – at 1801 S. 40th St. and previous home to the Bryan Focus Program – will soon provide a home for middle school students who need additional behavior, emotional and social support.

  • Sally G. Wysong was a long-time early childhood education advocate who ran the Meadowlane daycare/preschool in north. Later she served several terms on the Lincoln Board of Education as a staunch supporter of early childhood education.
  • Marilyn Moore was the Associate Superintendent for Instruction at LPS for many years, retired several years ago, and started her career in education as a middle school teacher with LPS. She often talked about the specific needs of middle school students, and initiated the process to transition LPS from the junior high to the middle school model.
  • Bill Nuernberger was the first separate juvenile judge for Lancaster County, a man who advocated that children and young people needed a separate court.

Policy changes

Board members approved policy changes about: Parental Involvement.

Public comment

More than 40 community members came to testify in the “Public Comment” segment of the Board meeting Tuesday – about professional development related to transgender, gender nonconforming and gender conforming students. Some testified with concerns about the professional staff training, others testified in support of giving LPS staff members guidance in ways to be sensitive to the needs of all students.

“It is a testament to our community that we all came together and had a calm and civil conversation,” said Board President Richard Meginnis. “I also commend our LPS staff for accommodating the more than 200 people who came to this Board meeting.”

Superintendent update

Superintendent Steve Joel thanked “all the parents and patrons who took the time to come out and share their thoughts…It’s heartening to hear so many of our trusted, loyal LPS supporters…hopefully have an understanding of what we’re trying to do… is always going to be about creating relationships with individual students…so that those students can be successful.”

Posted on October 15, 2014


Awareness and funds take the place of Sydni's hair

Sydni Sherman raised $1,151 and started a conversation longer than her hair, well longer than her hair used to be.

The sixth-grader at Lefler Middle School cut her once shoulder-length brown hair as part of a local fundraiser.

"I know a lot of people with cancer, and my friend died two years ago, and his aunt (cut her own hair) last year," she said. Her friends have been supportive, and some think it's "pretty cool."

And if others talk about why Sydni had her hair cut off?

"That's kind of the point."

Posted on October 15, 2014


Scott—longtime LPS principal, teacher, director—to retire

Bess Scott, a teacher, principal and director in Lincoln Public Schools for 25 years, will retire at the end of first semester to become a Managing Consultant in the Center for Systems Transformation with McREL International, a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan education research and development corporation. She begins her new position Jan. 1, 2015.

"This is quite an accomplishment and we are proud of Bess - and excited that students and staff outside Lincoln Public Schools will benefit from her years of insight and knowledge," LPS Superintendent Steve Joel said. "We will miss her enormous contributions, but now her passion for education will impact far beyond our school district."

Scott began with LPS in 1989 as a teacher at Pound Middle School. She has worked as a coordinator at Bryan Community Focus Program, an associate principal at Lincoln East High School, then principal at Goodrich Middle School and McPhee Elementary School. Most recently she was director of Elementary Education for LPS, and now serves as director of Continuous Improvement and Professional Learning.

Scott received her Masters from Kansas State University and Doctorate from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and has been involved in the local community by working with the Community Learning Center Leadership Council and the Clinic with a Heart board.

Posted on October 08, 2014


When why and how matter more than what

It was less what, and more why and how:  A few days of training in cultural proficiency at Lincoln Public Schools wasn’t about taking in new information, but how to process it.

Volunteer LPS staff members recently attended an intense three days of multicultural training so they could better understand cultural proficiency - then in turn share and pass it on to their colleagues.

The training process was enlightening.

LPS staff, which included staff members are various levels and backgrounds, focused less on what they knew or didn’t know, but how to engage in specific topics that directly applied to them. That was key.

After all, the volunteers included teachers, assistant principals, principals, directors and more.

The training, arranged by the Multicultural Department of LPS, was conducted by Delores and Randall Lindsey, professional researchers and coaches in multicultural issues.

The Lindseys are co-authors of over 14 books. LPS staff are using many of these books for the growth in the cultural proficiency journey. The training was based on their book, Culturally Proficient Coaching.

"Furthermore, the Lindsey's have presented at the Multicultural Institute and consultants to me and friends," said Thomas Christie, whose Multicultural Department sponsored the workshop.

Below are their comments after working with LPS staff.

Randy

“What I'm hearing is what we intend ... for people to talk about what they are learning, and what I'm hearing them talk about is, ‘How does this impact my practice?’

“No one is arguing with it; they see it as an additive; they see it as value.”

Delores

“The ‘it’ is cultural proficiency, and cultural proficiency is a way to examine the current work they are doing. We call it the inside out approach. The way a person examines their own values and beliefs, working in their own environment, as well as examining the policies and procedures in an organization.

Randy

“In interactions they are having with colleagues in service to students, and the student, the ultimate goal is, how do they make sure we are serving all student in equal ways.

“The focus is not what is wrong with the kids, but how can we do things different and more successfully so it puts us in control, rather than “What a pity, we can't do anything.”

Delores

“Good teachers use social media as an instructional tool, and really use it to open the global mindfulness of students. Many kids might never be able to leave their local community, but media and social media can help them interact with cultures in very different ways than my generation.

“They can learn about culture not from reading in the textbook but from interactions from across the world. Used appropriately social media can be a mindful experience of being a member of this planet in a very positive way.”

Randy

“Social media could end up resegregating but we are finding more and more places where educators and more students are using social media to open up, to cross barriers.

Delores

“What we are learning from our time is that the folks we are working with are assessing the needs, they are looking at this community and looking at all the demographics and data and establishing what the needs are, and then looking at their resources, who are their partners.

“The sessions are very interactive, so they are learning from us a little bit of content, but they are learning from each other, so there are a lot of cross cultural conversations, there are lot of sharing of experiences, so there is a high value diversity.”

“They have asked really good questions, they are curious, they are willing to look at possibilities, they are not stuck, they are willing to move forward.

“These folks will have jobs going on while they are here, so they are focused on professional learning. They are willing to come here and then do their day job, and the district supports their being here for professional growth.”



Posted on October 08, 2014


Lincoln Board of Education serenaded with Star-Spangled Banner

Highlights of Sept. 23 Lincoln Board of Education meeting

The Lincoln Board of Education met for a regular Board meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 23 at LPS District Office, 5905 O St. The next Board meeting is set for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14.

Board of Education meeting highlights

Star-Spangled Banner

The Star-Spangled Banner’s 200th birthday is this month, and Meadow Lane Elementary School helped the Lincoln Board of Education celebrate that special milestone Tuesday evening, serenading Board members with the country’s National Anthem.

Lance Nielsen, the music supervisor for Lincoln Public Schools, introduced the musical group – calling it a special presentation of the country’s most well known patriotic song.

A bit of background:

On September 14, 1814, U.S. soldiers at Baltimore’s Fort McHenry raised a huge American flag to celebrate a crucial victory over British forces during the War of 1812. The sight of those “broad stripes and bright stars” inspired 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key to write a song that eventually became the United States national anthem. Key’s words gave new significance to a national symbol and started a tradition through which generations of Americans have invested the flag with their own meanings and memories.

The children were directed by Meadow Lane music teacher Allegra Pennington.

Policy changes

Board members discussed policy changes about: Parental Involvement.  The policy will be approved at the Oct. 14 Board meeting.

Board of Education recognition

The Board of Education recognized Zachary Baehr, communications specialist at Lincoln Public Schools, selected to the annual prestigious “Class of 35 Under 35 Young Professionals” by the National School Public Relations Association.

Posted on October 08, 2014


LSE club hosting 5K run/walk event for charity

Lincoln Southeast High School’s Student Advocates for World Change and DECA are organizing a run called Run to the Rescue on November 8th at 8:00 AM at Southeast High School, starting in the school’s main parking lot. All proceeds will go to Tiny Hands International, a non-profit organization dedicated to empowering individuals in the developing world to help the poor overcome poverty. They are committed to finding the greatest injustices in the world and working towards relieving them however possible. Tiny Hands primary focuses are orphans, street children, and the victims of the sex-trafficking industry. The course for the run starts and finishes at Lincoln Southeast High School. Online Registration can be accessed on either the Eventbrite website under “Run to the Rescue” or on Facebook under “Run to the Rescue”. There will be a clock started at the beginning of the race, and prizes for top ranking runners. Water, food, t-shirts, and other items will be provided with registration. Help us "Run to the Rescue!"

Posted on October 08, 2014


Northeast earns national recognition for student achievement in financial literacy

Lincoln Northeast High School has earned status as a 2013-14 Blue Star School for its work with students in the Personal Finance course.

The honor is given by the organization, Working In Support of Education, or w!se, which in the case of Northeast, bases the honor on having all 12 students achieve an 80 percent grade on the Financial Literacy Certification Test. The course was taught by Deb Wolken.

Northeast Principal Kurt Glathar said, “Deb Wolken has done and outstanding job as our Business Department Chair. Her leadership is evident within the department, as well as with her students.”

Lincoln North Star High School, Lincoln Southwest High School and the Entrepreneurship Focus Program reached a passing rate, but didn’t have enough students taking the test to receive official recognition.

The W!SE test is taken as part of our new College Personal Finance class in its second year of offering. Student receive dual credit (Southeast Community College) with this course and it has recently been granted Weighted status.

Now that Take Charge is in its second year, 2014-15 students who are taking College Personal Finance can build on their Take Charge personal finance foundation.

In the award announcement letter, David Anderson, executive vice president of w!se, said, “Because of your dedicated and tireless commitment, you have given them vital knowledge about their personal finances. You have also provided them with the tools they need to become financially capable young adults.”

This type of course provides excellent foundational knowledge which, in turn, helps students perform at high levels within subsequent courses such as the Personal Finance course.  Lincoln Public Schools is grateful for strong community partners that continue to help our student achieve at high levels.

Posted on October 02, 2014


National Merit Semifinalists

National Merit Semifinalists in Lincoln Public Schools:

Lincoln East High School
Myan Bhoopalam, Emma Cooney, Erin Cooney, Shuowei Qin, Ingrid Zhang

Lincoln High School
Isabel Schneider and Carissa Wei!

Lincoln Northeast High School
A.J. Russert

Lincoln Southeast High School
Katelyn Richerson, Kylee Yakel, Viktor Turner and Yuzhao Shen

Lincoln Southwest High School
Cooper Christiancy and Makayla Haussler

From NationalMerit.org:

To ensure that academically talented young people from all parts of the United States are included in this talent pool, Semifinalists are designated on a state-representational basis. They are the highest scoring entrants in each state. NMSC provides scholarship application materials to Semifinalists through their high schools. To be considered for a National Merit® Scholarship, Semifinalists must advance to Finalist standing in the competition by meeting high academic standards and all other requirements explained in the information provided to each Semifinalist. Click here to learn about requirements for becoming a Finalist in the 2015 National Merit Scholarship Program.

Posted on September 30, 2014


New LPS school name recommendations: Sally Wysong Elementary, Marilyn Moore Middle, Bill Nuernberger Center

  • Sally Wysong Elementary School.
  • Marilyn Moore Middle School.
  • Bill Nuernberger Center.

The Lincoln Public Schools Community Naming Committee approved those three recommendations Monday for a new elementary and middle school – and a new title for the renovated facility at 1801 S. 40th St.

The new elementary and middle school will both be located in southeast Lincoln: The elementary school will open in the fall of 2016; the middle school will open in the fall of 2017. The renovated facility – at 1801 S. 40th St. and previous home to the Bryan Focus Program – will soon provide a home for middle school students who need additional behavior, emotional and social support.

  • Sally Wysong was a long-time early childhood education advocate who ran the Meadowlane daycare/preschool in north Lincoln – the first accredited preschool/nursery school in the state of Nebraska. Later she served several terms on the Lincoln Board of Education as a staunch supporter of early childhood education.
  • Marilyn Moore was the Associate Superintendent for Instruction at LPS for many years, retired several years ago, and started her career in education as a middle school teacher with LPS. She often talked about the specific needs of middle school students, and initiated the process to transition LPS from the junior high to the middle school model.
  • Bill Nuernberger was the first separate juvenile judge for Lancaster County, a man who advocated that children and young people needed a separate court.

The three nominations for names will be submitted to the Lincoln Board of Education for consideration and final approval.

The names are for:

  • New elementary school at South 61st Street and Blanchard Blvd.
  • New middle school at southeast corner near 84th Street and Yankee Hill Road
  • Renovated facility at 1801 S. 40th St.

Posted on September 30, 2014


School PTO wins local 'beautification' award for work with school

Eastridge Elementary School's Parent-Teacher Organization is a recipient of the 2014 Keep Lincoln and Lancaster County Beautiful Education Award.

The group's focus with recycling drives and 'green-themed' fun nights for students and families were factors in the recognition.

Posted on September 29, 2014


HUB hosting Diaper Drive

The HUB, a local nonprofit, is hosting a Diaper Drive from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wed., Oct. 8th at HyVee at 50th and O St.

The Hub’s annual diaper drive is led by the youth seeking services there. The public’s support of the drive will help stock the “diaper closet” for many months. The group, which as staff in some Lincoln Public Schools, provides support and programs for young people in transition as they become productive, independent and active members of the community.

For more information, visit their website.

Posted on September 29, 2014


Harvest of books opens Oct. 5

The Lincoln Education Association will run its annual Harvest of Books fall campaign from Oct. 5 to the 19th. The 2013 Harvest of Books distributed over 7,000 books in 58 schools. Participating bookstores are giving a 25% discount on children’s books purchased for the Harvest. Individuals may, if they wish, sign their name (or company name) to a bookplate that will be affixed to the book so the recipient knows who made the donation.

 Participating bookstores include:

  • Barnes & Noble Booksellers
  • Gloria Deo
  • Indigo Bridge Books
  • University Bookstore
  • I Read Books
  • Usborne Books at Home

Any new book may also be dropped off at the LEA Office.  Individuals who want to make a cash donation, we have LEA volunteers do the shopping for them, may send donations to the Harvest of Books, c/o the Lincoln Education Association, 4920 Normal Blvd., Lincoln, NE 68506.  Memorials in the name of individuals who were avid book lovers are a wonderful way to honor the memory of a loved one, too, and a way to instill their love for reading in a child.

More information about the Harvest of Books is available on the web at http://lincolneducationassociation.org/HarvestofBooks.html.

Posted on September 29, 2014


LSW's Fine Arts' Craft Fair on Oct. 11

The Lincoln Southwest Fine Arts and Crafts Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 11 at the school, 7001 S. 134th St. More than 80 vendors will be on hand with various handmade items. LSW's Speech and Debate teams will have homemade goodies and baked goods for sale at the concession stand. Admission is $2.

Posted on September 29, 2014


Staff can nominate juniors for Young Artist Awards

The Hixson-Lied College of Fine and Performing Arts is seeking applications for the 18th annual Nebraska Young Artist Awards. 

The Nebraska Young Artist Awards annually recognize 11th grade students from Nebraska who are gifted and talented in the areas of visual art, dance, music, theatre, and film and new media. These students exemplify the pinnacles of creativity in one of the fine and performing arts.

To be recognized, students must submit an application online, which includes uploading a sample of their work and a letter of recommendation from a teacher. Full instructions for the online application process are available athttp://go.unl.edu/nyaa.

Online applications must be submitted by Friday, Dec. 12.

The applications will be judged by UNL Hixson-Lied College of Fine and Performing Arts faculty, and the winning students will be invited to a special day of recognition on Wednesday, April 8, 2015.

Honored students will take tours of the arts facilities, attend classes, meet faculty and college students, and have lunch. Their parents will also be invited, and they will also take tours, as well as receive information on careers in the arts and college curriculum. The day will conclude with an awards ceremony.

Students selected to participate in the Nebraska Young Artist Awards will also be asked to nominate the teacher who provided them with the greatest amount of mentoring and support in the development of their special talents.  http://newsroom.unl.edu/announce/artsatunl/3568/19806 

Posted on September 26, 2014


Students benefits from local 'Stuff the Bus' promotion

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers partnered with KLKN's Channel 8 and Latsch's for its 6th Annual "Stuff the Bus" promotion to raise school supplies for Lincoln area PK-12 Students. Over a two-week period in July and August, residents in Lincoln and the surrounding communities answered when being called upon to donate new and packaged school supplies for students in-need throughout the Lincoln area. Thousands of school supplies and nearly $3,400 were donated at the three Lincoln Raising Cane’s restaurants.

Posted on September 26, 2014


Grant allows focus on PBiS training

Lincoln Public Schools has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Funding is about $250,000 per year for five years, and will be used to support staff and students through enhancement of the school district’s PBiS efforts, programs and strategies.

The grant – officially called a School Climate Transformation Grant – comes at the perfect time for LPS, as the school district has already started implementation of PBiS (Positive Behavior Interventions and Support), a multi-tiered behavioral framework.

Much of the grant funding will go toward broadening training to expand capacity and knowledge of PBiS, efforts that will likely connect with all certified staff. We will use grant resources specifically to:

  • provide training on social/emotional development and trauma-informed care,
  • implement evidence-based small group activities and enhanced mentoring for targeted groups of students,
  • pilot restorative practices in a high school setting,
  • and provide deeper training and consultation to schools.

During this grant period – and beyond – LPS will continue to focus on creating a systemic and sustainable program that integrates PBiS into all aspects of our schools, providing our students the necessary skills and interventions to succeed: academically, socially and emotionally.

Posted on September 26, 2014


LPS’s Bubba’s Closet will collect warm clothes in October

If your elementary-aged children have outgrown their winter coats, jackets, sweaters, sweatshirts or jeans, please consider dropping off those gently used clothes at any Hanger’s Cleaners throughout the month of October: from Wednesday, Oct. 1, through Friday, Oct. 31– so that other children might keep warm this winter.

Then, on Saturday, Nov. 15, those clothes will be available to the community’s children at the annual Bubba’s Closet event: 8:30 - 9:30 a.m. at McPhee Elementary School, 820 Goodhue Blvd. (820 S. 15th St.) Any elementary student, accompanied by an adult, may come and choose appropriate items of clothing to adopt and use – for free. There are no income requirements. Sacks will be provided by Lincoln Public Schools.

Please drop off your donated winter clothes at Hanger’s Cleaners located at: 2525 Pine Lake Road, 2655 S. 70th St., 1550 Coddington, or 2101 G St. All clothes will be cleaned by Hanger’s at no charge, and sorted by Lincoln Public Schools elementary principals, who sponsor this annual event.

Bubba’s Closet is one of the many American Education Week activities planned in LPS.

Posted on September 23, 2014


LPS High School Music/Theater Calendar

High schools in Lincoln Public Schools perform various music and theater performances throughout the year. For more information about a specific event, call the school. To add a music or theater performance to this list, email zbaehr@lps.org.

September 2014

25-27 - Theater: Fall Play, East, Sept. 25-27, 7 p.m., auditorium

29 - Concert: Jazz Band, Singers, Orchestras, East, Sept. 29, 7 p.m., auditorium

October 2014

2-4 - Theater: Cinderella, Lincoln High School, Oct. 2-3 at 7 p.m., Oct. 4 at 2 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

2-4 - Theater: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, North Star, Oct. 2-3 at 7 p.m. and Oct. 4 at 2:30 and 7 p.m.

4 - Marching Band: Southeast at Capitol City Marching Band Championships, Oct. 4, Time TBA, Seacrest Field

7 - Concert: Choral, North Star, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., Auditorium

9 - Concert: Instrumental, North Star, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., Auditorium

9-12 - Theater: Fall Play,The Diviners, Southeast, Oct. 9-12, 7:30 p.m., Auditorium

16 - Concert: Choir, Southeast's Singing Knights Concert, Oct. 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

18 - Marching Band: Southeast at LPS Marching Band Contest, Oct. 18, afternoon, Seacrest Field

20 - Concert: Jazz, Southeast, Oct. 20, 7 p.m.

21 - Concert: Orchesta, Southeast, Oct. 21, 7 p.m.

22 - Concert: Choirs, Southeast's Knight Sounds, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.  

25 - Marching Band: Southeast at NSBA State Marching Band Contest, Oct. 25, Time TBA, Seacrest Field

28 - Performance: Jazzy Strings Soup Supper, Northeast, Oct. 28, 6 p.m., LNE Commons Area

November 2014

2 - Theater: Day of the Dead, Lincoln High School, Nov. 2, time TBA, Sheldon Art Gallery

4, 6 - “Grease”, The Musical, Northeast, November 4, 6, 6 p.m., LNE Auditorium (Tickets, $10, $8, $6)

7, 8 - “Grease”, The Musical, Northeast, November 7, 8 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium (Tickets, $10, $8, $6)

6-8 - Theater: Fiddler on the Roof Musical, East, Nov. 6-8, 7 p.m., auditorium

December 2014

3 - Winter Expressions Instrumental Concert, Northeast, Dec. 3, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium

4 - Theater: These Shining Lives, Lincoln High School, Dec. 4, 7 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

4-5 - Theater: One Act Plays, East HS, Dec. 4-5, 7 p.m., auditorium

4-13 - Theater: Irving Berlin's White Christmas, Dec. 4, 5, 6 and 11, 12, 13 at 7 p.m., Tickets go on sale November 4, call 402-436-1335

5 - Theater: One Acts, Southeast, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m., auditorium

9 - Concert: Winter Choral, East HS, Dec. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium

9 - Concert: Jazz Band, Southeast, Dec. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium

9 - Concert: Choral, North Star, Dec. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium 

10 - Candlelight Gala Vocal Concert, Northeast, Dec. 10, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium

15 - Concert: Southeast, Dec. 15, 6:30 p.m. orchestra, and 7:30 p.m., Wind ensemble and Symponic band, auditorium

15 - Concert: Winter Band, East, Dec. 15, 7 p.m., auditorium

16 - Concert: Instrumental, North Star, Dec. 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

January 2015

16 - Theater: Southeast, Thespian Showcase, Jan. 16, 7:30 p.m., auditorium

February 2015

5-7 - Night of Knights, Southeast, Feb. 5-7, 7 p.m., auditorium

7 - Competition: Show Choir Showdown at Lincoln Southwest HS, Feb. 7, all day

9 - Concert: Bands, East HS, Feb. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium

16 - Concert: Orchestra and Wind Ensemble, Feb. 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

17 - Recital Night, Northeast, February 17, 6 p.m., LNE Room 170 and 006

19 - Choir: Queen's Ct, Southeast, Feb. 19, 7 p.m., auditorium

21 - Competition: Vocal/Instrumental Solo & Ensemble at Lincoln High, Feb. 21, 8 p.m.

23 - Concert: Jazz Band, Southeast, Feb. 23, 7 p.m., auditorium

26-28 - Musical: Once On This Island JR, Lincoln High School, Feb. 26-27 at 7 p.m., Feb. 28 at 2 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

March 

5-6 - Theater: International Baccalaureate Student Directed Productions: Melancholy Play, The Mousetrap, Gruseome Playground Injuries, Lincoln High School, March 5-6, Time TBA

7 - Concert: Orchestra Finale, East, March 3, 7 p.m., auditorium

7 - The Rock Show Choir Competition, Northeast, March 7, 8 a.m. - TBA, LNE Auditorium

4 - Concert: Choirs, Southeast, March 4, 7 p.m., auditorium

19 - All-city instrumental festival, Southeast, March 19, 7 p.m., Prasch

21 - Spring Swing Dance, Hosted by LNE Honors Jazz Band, Northeast, March 21, 6 p.m., LNE Center Gym

24 - Wind Ensemble performs at the District Middle School Honors Event, Northeast, March 24, 6:30 p.m., LNE North Gym

28 - Competition: Jazz Spring Swing Dance at Lincoln Northeast HS, March 28, 7 p.m.

April 2015

3-11 - Theater: Spring Play, East HS, April 3-5 and 9-11, 7 p.m., auditorium

8 - Spring Vocal Concert, Northeast, April 8, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium

9-11 - Theater: Arsenic and Old Lace, April 9, 10, 11, 2015 at 7 p.m., Tickets go on sale March 9, call 402-436-1335

13 - Concert: Bands and Orchestras, East, April 13, 7 p.m., auditorium

15 - Spring Instrumental Concert, Northeast, April 15, 7 p.m., LNE Media Center

15 - Concert: Choirs, Southeast, April 15, 7 p.m., Commons

16 - Concert: Spring Choir, East, April 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

25 - Competition: Lincoln East Jazz Festival at EHS, April 25, all day, auditorium

27 - Concert: Jazz Band Concert Cafe, East HS, April 27, 7 p.m., auditorium

30 - Musical: Southeast, April 30-May 3, 7:30 p.m. with 2 p.m. Sunday matinee, auditorium

30 - Theater: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Lincoln High School, April 30-May 1 at 7 p.m., May 2 at 2 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

May 2015

1-2 - Theater: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Lincoln High School, April 30-May 1 at 7 p.m., May 2 at 2 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

1-3 - Musical: Southeast, April 30-May 3, 7:30 p.m. with 2 p.m. Sunday matinee, auditorium

1, 2 - Rock Show, Northeast, May 1-2, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium, ($5)

7 - Concert: Jazz Band, Southeast, May 7, 7 p.m., auditorium

8-9 - Concert: Expressions, East HS, May 8-9, 8 p.m.

11 - Concert: Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble, Southeast, May 11, 7 p.m., auditorium

12 - Concert: A Little Knight Music, Southeast, May 12, 7 p.m., auditorium

12 - Concert: Bands, East HS, May 12, 6 p.m., auditorium

13 - Concert: Orchestra, Southeast, May 13, 7 p.m., auditorium

13 - Finale Concert and Awards Ceremony, Northeast, May 13, 6 p.m., LNE Auditorium

16 - Concert: Spring Swing, Southeast, May 16

18-19 - Theater: Nunsense - LSW Faculty Production, May 18-19, 7 p.m., Tickets go on sale April 18, call 402-436-1335

24 - Concert Choir@ LNE Graduation, Northeast, May 24, 4:30 p.m., Devaney Center 

School Listing

Lincoln East High School

Theater: Fall Play, East HS, Sept. 25-27, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Jazz Band, Singers, Orchestras, East HS, Sept. 29, 7 p.m., auditorium

Theater: Fiddler on the Roof Musical, East HS, Nov. 6-8, 7 p.m., auditorium

Theater: One Act Plays, East HS, Dec. 4-5, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Winter Choral, East HS, Dec. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Winter Band, East HS, Dec. 15, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Show Choirs Showcase, East HS, Jan. 15, 7 p.m., auditorium

Competition: Show Choir Showdown at Lincoln Southwest HS, Feb. 8, all day

Concert: Bands, East HS, Feb. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium

Competition: Vocal/Instrumental Solo & Ensemble at Lincoln High, Feb. 21, 8 p.m.

Concert: Orchestra Finale, East HS, March 3, 7 p.m., auditorium

Competition: Jazz Spring Swing Dance at Lincoln Northeast HS, March 28, 7 p.m.

Theater: Spring Play, East HS, April 3-5 and 9-11, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Bands and Orchestras, East HS, April 13, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Spring Choir, East HS, April 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

Competition: Lincoln East Jazz Festival at EHS, April 25, all day, auditorium

Concert: Jazz Band Concert Cafe, East HS, April 27, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Expressions, East HS, May 8-9, 8 p.m.

Concert: Bands, East HS, May 12, 6 p.m., auditorium

Lincoln High School

Theater: Cinderella, Lincoln High School, Oct. 2-3 at 7 p.m., Oct. 4 at 2 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre

Theater: Day of the Dead, Lincoln High School, Nov. 2, time TBA, Sheldon Art Gallery

Theater: These Shining Lives, Lincoln High School, Dec. 4, 7 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

Musical: Once On This Island JR, Lincoln High School, Feb. 26-27 at 7 p.m., Feb. 28 at 2 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

Theater: International Baccalaureate Student Directed Productions: Melancholy Play, The Mousetrap, Gruseome Playground Injuries, Lincoln High School, March 5-6, Time TBA

Theater: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Lincoln High School, April 30-May 1 at 7 p.m., May 2 at 2 p.m., Ted Sorensen Theatre, LHS

Lincoln North Star High School

Concert: Choral, North Star, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Concert: Instrumental, North Star, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Concert: Choral, North Star, Dec. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium 

Concert: Instrumental, North Star, Dec. 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

Lincoln Northeast High School

Performance: Jazzy Strings Soup Supper, Northeast, Oct. 28, 6 p.m., LNE Commons Area

“Grease”, The Musical, Northeast, November 4, 6, 6 p.m., LNE Auditorium (Tickets, $10, $8, $6)

“Grease”, The Musical, Northeast, November 7, 8 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium (Tickets, $10, $8, $6)

Showstoppers Vocal Concert, Northeast, November 13, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium

Music Booster Meeting, Northeast, Nov. 17, 6:30 p.m., LNE Media Center

Drumline Performs at the Strutter Show, Northeast, Nov. 25, 7:30 p.m., LNE North Gym

Winter Expressions Instrumental Concert, Northeast, Dec. 3, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium

Candlelight Gala Vocal Concert, Northeast, Dec. 10, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium

Recital Night, Northeast, February 17, 6 p.m., LNE Room 170 and 006

The Rock Show Choir Competition, Northeast, March 7, 8 a.m. - TBA, LNE Auditorium

Spring Swing Dance, Hosted by LNE Honors Jazz Band, Northeast, March 21, 6 p.m., LNE Center Gym

Wind Ensemble performs at the District Middle School Honors Event, Northeast, March 24, 6:30 p.m., LNE North Gym

Spring Vocal Concert, Northeast, April 8, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium

Spring Instrumental Concert, Northeast, April 15, 7 p.m., LNE Media Center

Rock Show, Northeast, May 1-2, 7 p.m., LNE Auditorium, ($5)

Finale Concert and Awards Ceremony, Northeast, May 13, 6 p.m., LNE Auditorium

Concert Choir@ LNE Graduation, Northeast, May 24, 4:30 p.m., Devaney Center

Lincoln Southeast High School

Marching Band: Southeast at Capitol City Marching Band Championships, Oct. 4, Time TBA, Seacrest Field

Theater: Fall Play, Southeast HS, Oct. 9-12, 7:30 p.m., Auditorium

Concert: Choir, Southeast's Singing Knights Concert, Oct. 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

Marching Band: Southeast at LPS Marching Band Contest, Oct. 18, afternoon, Seacrest Field

Concert: Jazz, Southeast, Oct. 20, 7 p.m.

Concert: Orchesta, Southeast, Oct. 21, 7 p.m.

Concert: Choirs, Southeast's Knight Sounds, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.  

Marching Band: Southeast at NSBA State Marching Band Contest, Oct. 25, Time TBA, Seacrest Field

Theater: One Acts, Southeast, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Jazz Band, Southeast, Dec. 9, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Southeast, Dec. 15, 6:30 p.m. orchestra, and 7:30 p.m., Wind ensemble and Symponic band, auditorium

Theater: Southeast, Thespian Showcase, Jan. 16, 7:30 p.m., auditorium

Night of Knights, Southeast, Feb. 5-7, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Orchestra and Wind Ensemble, Feb. 16, 7 p.m., auditorium

Choir: Queen's Ct, Southeast, Feb. 19, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Jazz Band, Southeast, Feb. 23, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Choirs, Southeast, March 4, 7 p.m., auditorium

All-city instrumental festival, Southeast, March 19, 7 p.m., Prasch

Concert: Choirs, Southeast, April 15, 7 p.m., Commons

Musical: Southeast, April 30-May 3, 7:30 p.m. with 2 p.m. Sunday matinee, auditorium

Concert: Jazz Band, Southeast, May 7, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble, Southeast, May 11, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: A Little Knight Music, Southeast, May 12, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Orchestra, Southeast, May 13, 7 p.m., auditorium

Concert: Spring Swing, Southeast, May 16

Lincoln Southwest High School

Theater: A Chorus Line - Silver Hawk Theatre’s 50th Production, Aug. 21, 22, 23, 2014 at 7 p.m. and Aug. 23 at 2 p.m. Tickets on sale now, call 402-436-1335. Mild Language & subject matter - may not be suitable for young children

Theater: Irving Berlin’s WHITE CHRISTMAS, Dec. 4, 5, 6 and 11, 12, 13 at 7 p.m., Tickets go on sale November 4, call 402-436-1335

Theater: Arsenic and Old Lace, April 9, 10, 11, 2015 at 7 p.m., Tickets go on sale March 9, call 402-436-1335

Theater: Nunsense - LSW Faculty Production, May 18-19, 7 p.m., Tickets go on sale April 18, call 402-436-1335

 

Posted on September 22, 2014


Bubba's Closet donations accepted at Hanger's locations

Bubba’s Closet, a goodwill effort by the elementary principals of Lincoln Public Schools, is accepting elementary-age clothing that your children have outgrown.

Your donations will be cleaned by Hanger’s, sorted by LPS principals and then shared with families in need at an event in November.

When cleaning out your closets, sort out donations for kids that need warm jackets, pants and shirts, and bring them to Hangers locations on Pine Lake Road near 25th street, Van Dorn and 70th streets, 21 and G streets and 1550 S. Coddington.

Those families who have clothing needs for their child can visit McPhee Elementary School, just south of the state capital at 820 Goodhue Blvd., from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 15. You will be given a bag for winter coats, jackets, sweaters, sweatshirts or jeans, and more.

Any elementary student, accompanied by an adult, may choose appropriate items of clothing to adopt and use.

Posted on September 19, 2014


Promote your school through Senior Q&A

Wanting to promote your club or activity or sport? Or just want your students to get recognition?

Encourage seniors to complete the Senior Q&A

Questions are based on how their experiences make them better students, their favorite classes and moments, and advice for others, so we anticipate positive responses. Staff members are encouraged to share this opportunity with seniors.

The goal is to create more content about the great things our students are doing, with a hook for 'extracurricular activities.' These Q&A responses will be promoted on the LPS website, sometimes through LPS social media, but more importantly, they will be great content for high school Facebook pages and Twitter accounts, even your school web site. 

The students' answers will remain private until we re-read them, proof them, and eventually publish them once we receive a photo from the student. Any questionable wording or stories will be removed or edited. 

For more information, contact Zachary Baehr at zbaehr@lps.org.

Posted on September 18, 2014


Arts in Education Week in LPS

This week is designated Arts in Education Week by the United States Congress.
 
Lincoln Public Schools Art Department goals are that students will be able to:
 
  • Acquire skills to be able to analyze, reflect, understand and communicate ideas prevalent in today’s Visual Age of media rich culture.
  • Understand that art is a form of literacy and can convey meaning through content (subject matter, themes, metaphors, irony), context (personal, cultural, historical, artistic), and Form (elements and principles of design, techniques, genres and styles).
  • Create ideas that are meaning-laden. Conveying concepts, feelings, values and qualities.
  • Identify and understand cross-cultural understanding that happen within art. As global interdependence between people and societies continue to develop, art helps students understand the diversity of cultures as well as commonalities.
  • Develop cognitive skills of observation, creativity, reflection, critical thinking (problem finding), problem solving, recognizing multiple and diverse interpretations and confront ambiguity.

Schools are encouraged to share photos of their student artwork by emailing the images to zbaehr@lps.org.

Students can also participate in our monthly Art Challenge in Community News.

Posted on September 18, 2014


Learning Lunches 2014-15: Untold stories of LPS

Come hear a few of the “Untold Stories” of Lincoln Public Schools in the second annual series of bring-your-own-lunch presentations, Learning Lunches, open to the community – beginning with a program at noon on Tuesday, Sept. 16.

For all lunches: Lunches will be held in the Board Room at LPS District Office, 5905 O St. Doors to the Board Room will open at noon, the program will begin at 12:15 p.m., questions-and-answers will happen at 12:45 p.m. Please bring your own lunch. Community members are welcome to stay after lunch for a tour of the LPS District Office building.

This year’s schedule:

  • Tuesday, Sept. 16. Glass Plate Photos of Early Lincoln/More treasures from the LPS Archives: Ed Zimmer, Lincoln’s historic preservation planner and a member of the Lincoln Board of Education.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 21. Mythbusters, Education Edition: We're not failing: Rob McEntarffer, Assessment and Evaluation specialist at LPS.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 18. My Immigrant Experience – Dreams, Challenges and the Reality of Living in an Adopted Country: Oscar Rios Pohirieth, cultural specialist and coordinator for Bilingual Liaison Program at LPS.
  • Tuesday, Jan 20. Educating Youth in Detention: Randy Farmer, supervisor of the Pathfinder Education Program at LPS.
  • Tuesday, Feb. 17. Managing Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussions in Our Schools: Cindy Brunken, supervisor of the Speech-Language Pathology Program at LPS.
  • Tuesday, March 17: Educational Based Athletics: Kathi Wieskamp, director of Athletics and Activities at LPS.
  • Tuesday, April 21. The Rhythm of Music in our Schools.

Posted on September 15, 2014


CSM offering tech workshop as professional development opportunity

College of St. Mary's here in Omaha is offering a technology workshop as a professional development opportunity for area K-12 teachers. The workshop is Wednesday from 5 to 7 p.m. on CSM's campus. The workshop is free of charg. The link for registration is below.

https://csmweb.csm.edu/Event_Registration/register.asp?EventID=942

Posted on September 12, 2014


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